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I have some difficulty understanding the construction とか言う気だろう 

Context: the protagonist is trying to learn a new skill and he is surprised by the move made by his teacher.

ひょっとして、これが潜伏スキルだとか言う気だろうか。

... Was that supposed to be the ambush (skill) ?

The part とか言う seems to refer to "something like" (By the way, I do not understand the だ just before)

I have found some hints here

Meaning of this どうだとか言う construction

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    To understand it better, read it as とか言う+気+だろう. Now とか言うindicates some degree of uncertainty about what's stated before it, that is, これが潜伏スキルだ, and connects the whole phrase as a description of 気. You can read 気 as "intention" here. And again we have だろう which adds yet another degree of supposition/uncertainty. Put it all together with the か and you can see how it is translated as "Was that supposed to be" + the sentence quoted by とか. (note that these are not linguistically-valid terminology, and just used to clear things up)
    – zareami10
    Commented Jan 9, 2021 at 14:25
  • thanks a lot for your comment , makes things clear. Now should I close the question, or something else ?
    – Makoto
    Commented Jan 9, 2021 at 15:53
  • Don't close it; it's a good question. The first thing to do would be to request that @zareami10 convert the comment to answer. If you get no response then I would recommend adding it as an answer yourself with credit to zareami10 and tick the 'community wiki' box. Commented Jan 9, 2021 at 17:35
  • Done as you told me, I was not aware of the community wiki, thanks
    – Makoto
    Commented Jan 9, 2021 at 18:49

1 Answer 1

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With credit to

@zareami10

To understand it better, read it as

とか言う+気+だろう

Now とか言う indicates some degree of uncertainty about what's stated before it, that is, これが潜伏スキルだ, and connects the whole phrase as a description of 気. You can read 気 as "intention" here.

And again we have だろう which adds yet another degree of supposition/uncertainty.

Put it all together with the か and you can see how it is translated as "Was that supposed to be" + the sentence quoted by とか. (note that these are not linguistically-valid terminology, and just used to clear things up)

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