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Literally it appears to translate to "It's not a hated development"

But google translate puts it as "I don't hate it". The subtitles of the program I'm watching put it as "I don't dislike the idea".

I wonder if it is an idiomatic way to say that I don't hate something, or if it specifically is referring to a development.

For example, if you tried some ice cream and it was okay, would you say 嫌いな展開じゃないよ

I assume not. Whereas if you went into your performance review and they said we're going to give you a performance review and if you pass we'll promote you, could you say afterwards to your friend 嫌いな展開じゃないよ (i.e. I don't dislike this [unexpected] development)?

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    The first rule of Google Translate is "Do not trust Google Translate." – Eiríkr Útlendi Dec 19 '20 at 0:40
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For example, if you tried some ice cream and it was okay, would you say 嫌いな展開じゃないよ

For this, my answer is no, you may say 悪くない or simply 美味い. I think 展開 has the meaning here that the story is developing and you are expecting something interesting or good will happen later. There seems to be no follow-up in this case.

For the performance review situation, I'm not sure, but it seems a little weird, because in this situation you have not yet pass the performance review. I think after you getting the result of performance review you can use it, as at that time, you are expecting something more certain for a longer period.

Hope it helps and tell me if I'm wrong. Thanks!

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