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In the below I am a bit confused by what the narrator means in the below. Part of what is confusing me is what is meant by 一枚のバインダー. I understand the sentence to mean something like "The panoramic view from here is such that you could fit them all in one binder", but what does it mean by one binder?

予想通り、小高い丘の上に建つ学園の屋上からの景色は絶景だった。駅前から始まるほぼ一本道の通学路、商店街に緑地公園、学園前にあるやや長めの坂。どれも一枚のバインダーに収まるくらい、ここからの景色はすべてを一望できた。

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    「ファインダー」の間違いとか…? – naruto Oct 26 '20 at 16:31
  • Where's this from? – JansthcirlU Oct 26 '20 at 20:17
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1枚のバインダーに収まるくらい makes little sense to me in this context, either. バインダー in Japanese normally refers to that ring binder used to bundle loose leaves. However, loose leaf binders are normally counted using , not 枚. In addition, a binder can contain hundreds of pictures, but you need something that is small in this context:

~に収まるくらいすべてを一望できた。
I could watch everything in one view enough to be contained in ~.
(一望 = to have one view that contains everything in the scene. It usually means "panoramic/wide view", but in this context it's about "compact/at-a-glance view" like this.)

Assuming this バインダー is not a loose leaf binder.... so what is the thing 1) that can be called or mistaken as バインダー, 2) that is inherently small, and 3) that may be counted with 枚?

  • Maybe the author meant "clipboard"? Looks like バインダー is a rare synonym for this (I didn't know this, but see this article).
  • Maybe the author meant ファインダー "(camera) viewfinder"?
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  • Does「どれも収まる」in this case mean "each gets contained" or "they all get contained" ? – JansthcirlU Oct 27 '20 at 7:49
  • @JansthcirlU The latter in this case because of すべてを一望できる ("provides an at-a-glance view of everything"). – naruto Oct 27 '20 at 7:57
  • But doesn't the「すべて一望できた」refer to「ここからの景色」? Doesn't the「、」have the function of「で」, meaning that they are just two separate sentences talking about different things? – JansthcirlU Oct 27 '20 at 8:09
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    @JansthcirlU This くらい means "to the point where ~", and adverbially modifies 一望できた even though there is a comma. Thus the part before comma must be a description of how he could see everything at the same time from one certain field of view. – naruto Oct 27 '20 at 9:49

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