2

We know that Vteあげる can be used when we talk about the giver doing a; generous act, favour or being helpful. Further, we know that Vteあげる can be used when the two people are of the almost same social background.

  • E.g 私は山田さんに本を買ってあげた (This means I brought a book for Yamada San (It can be out of a fovour or help)

So, my first question is can we use Vte差し上げる if we are giving to someone who has a higher social status

  • E.g. 私は先生に本を買って差し上げた(This means I brought a book for the Teacher (It can be out of help or kindness, like giving it as a present)

So my 2nd question is, if we use Vte差し上げる won't it be a bit rude as he is of a higher status and we are showing we did some grateful act to him.

Further, can Vteあげる and Vte差し上げる be used, in those cases where one does an act for another, however, he is not doing this as a favour or help but doing it for someone else.

1

This is difficult question... At a glance of the question I thought "差し上げる" is commonly used but the example you showed ("私は先生に本を買って差し上げた") led me to rude sense a little bit...

if we use Vte差し上げる won't it be a bit rude as he is of a higher status and we are showing we did some grateful act to him

I can't tell you clearly but mostly yes!!
Especially in your example, as I said above, it sounds like showing grateful act.
It sounds like "上から目線" which is really popular Japanese phrase meaning like 'Looking down on someone from higher place'.

So even though '差し上げる' is a polite form of 'あげる', anyway it tends to cause an implication like "I give YOU. Thanks!!". It sounds rude especially in case the givee has higher social status.

Further, can Vteあげる and Vte差し上げる be used, in those cases where one does an act for another, however, he is not doing this as a favour or help but doing it for someone else.

Sorry, I may not get this question clearly. I thought favour or help is kind of doing for someone, isn't it?

Anyway, the answer would be no. Vteあげる and Vte差し上げる certainly indicate an action of favour or help by its subject.
However, in many cases, telling this action directly to givee sounds pushy. It's supposed to be rude to let listeners/readers notice the talker/writer is the giver. That's Japanese mind. Japanese people are sensitive.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.