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Is there a casual alternative for よろしく. For example, when speaking with close friends, I want to say something along the lines of "from now onwards, lets continue getting along", or something along those lines. The best I can think of is これからよろしく but that sounds extremely stiff and formal

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    "From now onwards, let's continue getting along" sounds very stiff and formal in the first place. – Casey May 2 at 22:02
  • @Casey 確かに。Was really thinking of something along those lines, but just couldn't find the words for it – Newbie May 3 at 7:58
  • To clarify your question to get better answers: You asked about "speaking with close friends". Did you by "from now onwards, lets continue getting along" mean that you were looking for some "let's forget today's fight, and be friends again?" I mean, one would not normally need the yoroshikuonegaishimasu-things between close friends. – Tuomo May 3 at 14:28
  • @Tuomo Not a fight, getting along well. It's more along the lines of "Cheers to another great year", really a british thing. An easier to understand phrase would be "Here's to another great year" or "Let's have a great year" – Newbie May 3 at 14:54
  • @Newbie sorry, I am a Finn and we (incl Kimi the Iceman) aren't so talkative unless there is need to. Now that you make me think, could be that the Japanese also would not explicitly state "their firm intention to continue the amicable relationship" – Tuomo May 3 at 15:02
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よろしく is already fairly casual and colloquial, and you should not seek even more casual alternatives. In formal situations, you must say at least よろしくお願いします. You should say どうぞよろしくお願い致します when you need to be very polite.

(Well, there are よろ and シクヨロ, which are much more slangy and charai, but I'd say "don't use them", especially as a equivalent of "nice to meet you". If you used them, it might sound just funny because you're a learner, but if I used them I would probably sound over-friendly and even offending.)

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  • Thanks. しくよろ sounds to me like the thing they do with パイセン for example. Is this way of reversing syllabus a trend these days, especially amongst closer firiends? – Newbie May 3 at 15:00
  • Typo: should really be syllable instead of syllabus – Newbie May 3 at 15:16
  • @Newbie This is actually an old trend. See this. You would still see this in fiction, but no one around me use it unless a joke is intended. よろ is also a "lazy" reply similar to おk, in which case it's relatively safer among close friends. – naruto May 3 at 15:29

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