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I'm a newish Japanese learner. I've been reading and translating short Japanese comics and videos to help familiarize myself with new kanji and word-play and whatnot. However, I've been stuck for a few days trying to decipher the meaning of this specific sentence:

お前の落着き先も

早く見つけてやらないとな

I can't quite figure out the meaning of 落着き先 here. I understand the second part is along the lines of "I have to see/find [it] soon." But the first part is what's confusing me the most.

I know the separate meanings of 落着き (落ち着き) and 先, but together I just can't understand it. I've tried searching multiple sites, reading multiple Japanese blogs/pages that use this word, and yet I just can't seem to make heads or tails of it.

For context, both lines are spoken by the same character. He says this to himself regarding a child he's taking care of. While both lines are separate textboxes, it's pretty obvious they connect.

Thank you in advance to anybody who reads this, it means a lot to me.

  • You've written "見っけて"; are you sure it isn't "見つけて"? – Nanigashi Apr 29 at 20:25
  • You're right! Flub on my part, sorry! It's 見つけて. ^^' – Wildmask May 5 at 23:49
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If you look up 落ち着き in a dictionary you can find definitions like "aplomb", "calm", "peacefulness" or "cool", but this is not how 落ち着き is used here. Here 落ち着き is simply the masu-stem of the verb 落ち着く, which can mean "to settle (down)" or "to finally end up".

  • いろいろな議論があったが、リーダーは彼に落ち着いた。
    There was a lot of discussion, but it was settled that he was the leader.
  • たくさん引っ越しをして、今は横浜に落ち着いています。
    I moved many times, and now I have settled in Yokohama.
  • そろそろ落ち着いて身を固めなさいよ。
    It's time for you to settle down and {marry someone / get a steady job}.

先 here is a suffix that refers to a (remote) place to which the preceding action is related. Look up 旅先, 連絡先 or 行き先. See: Why is 先 needed in アルバイト先で?

Therefore, this 落ち着き先 means "the place you settle in". The type of "place" depends on the context, but probably he is looking for the listener's next habitat and/or job.

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