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My ultimate goal is to translate the following sentence one by one:

ユリアン**の優しさに乗っちゃおう的な

What I know is that ちゃう/じゃう is the informal form of しまう. As far as I know, I can express two things with しまう:

  1. Do something completely and finish it: 例: 本を読んでしまいました。
  2. Do something by accident: 例: 花瓶を割ってしまった。

Again I can conjugate ちゃう/じゃう as usual. So ちゃおう/じゃおう is like しょう. (Let's...) So in my opinion I could translate 本を読んじゃおう with "Let's read this book completely.", but the 2nd case does not really work, isn't it?

My quesions:

  1. Is the stuff above correct?
  2. What does the 的な at the end of 乗っちゃおう do? How do you translate it? As far as I know I can use 的 to change a noun to an adjective (個人 -> 個人的), but thats it.
  3. 優しさ is the noun of 優しい. I have never seen 優しさ乗る bevor and my dictionary does not know it as well. What is this? Do similar things exist? For example 長さ乗る?
  4. What is the translation of the sentence from above and how does it change, if I would say ユリアンの優しさに乗っちゃおう or ユリアンの優しさに乗っちゃう的な.

Thanks a lot! I am sorry for this many questions in one question but I don't really know how I could split this up...


** my name

2 Answers 2

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  1. Is the stuff above correct?

Looks good to me. But the real language is often more complicated and interrelated than the textbook, that is, I would call this ちゃう = てしまう an "opportunistic action", or some "I didn't expect it, but now there it is, so why don't" feeling. It'll be somewhere in between your #1 and #2.

  1. What does the 的な at the end of 乗っちゃおう do? How do you translate it? As far as I know I can use 的 to change a noun to an adjective (個人 -> 個人的), but thats it.

This is a recent slang which is very common in casual speech. In a "good" grammar 的 is a suffix forming a na-adjective, but in this usage, it takes a phrase or sentence of any length to mean "like —", "— wise" or "— kind of". It is a loose complementizer, or sometimes doesn't have real meaning, as like in "I'm like okay". You can use みたいな in the same way.

  1. 優しさ is the noun of 優しい. I have never seen 優しさ乗る bevor and my dictionary does not know it as well. What is this? Do similar things exist? For example 長さ乗る?

乗る has multiple meanings, especially:

勢いがついて物事がぐあいよく運ぶ。勢いにまかせてすすむ。「興が―・る」「図に―・る」「ブームに―・る」「仕事が軌道に―・る」

誘いや持ち掛けに応じて仲間や相手になる。仲間として加わる。参画する。「その話に一口―・る」「相談に―・る」

相手の思惑どおりに動かされる。引っかかる。だまされる。「おだてに―・る」「口車に―・る」「その手には―・らない」

None of above is the exact match to this specific use case, but it's somewhat related to all of them. 優しさに乗る could be translated "take one up to one's kindness" in this context. It isn't a common way to say it, but fully understandable.

  1. What is the translation of the sentence from above and how does it change, if I would say ユリアンの優しさに乗っちゃおう or ユリアンの優しさに乗っちゃう的な.

的な has two possible interpretations whether it has an implicit or explicit word to modify, or is independent. That is:

It's let's-make-good-use-of-ユリアン's-kindness kinda [something].

or

IMO let's make good use of ユリアン's kindness.

If you change ちゃおう to ちゃう, it loses the "let's" meaning.

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  • Thanks a lot! It seems like 乗る is much more complex as I thought... I have a small follow up question about 的な. So 最近何かと忙しい的な would be a "perfectly fine" spoken sentence? If not could you give me one more example or a reference link?
    – Sqyuli
    Mar 24, 2020 at 16:42
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    @Sqyuli Yes it sounds perfectly natural, though I can't pinpoint what that 的な means without context (probably just wanted to tell their status). Mar 25, 2020 at 14:46
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優しさに乗る means to give in to/go along with someone's kindness. (NB: 乗る)

The use of しまう here (乗ってしまう→乗っちゃう) conveys an acknowledgment of deriving benefit from someone. By giving in to your kindness, the speaker is gaining something.

The しまおう form conveys an intention to do something.

的な is a slang version of みたいな, which, when used to end a sentence, can convey polite hesitance.

Put all together, one possible translation would be "well, okay, I guess I'll let you be nice to me" said in a playful tone.

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  • Thanks a lot for your answer! I really like your last translation! What does NB stands for?
    – Sqyuli
    Mar 24, 2020 at 16:37
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    It stands for “Nota bene” :)
    – Al Gorithm
    Mar 24, 2020 at 16:38

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