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So this literally translates into "I landed it." Which is literally what Kamata-kun (this character from Shin Godzilla) did. But is that really all it means? Is it a Japanese double entendre or pun or have any other connotation other than he came up on land? In English we might say you "landed something" as in you got a good job or achieved something worthwhile. Is that it? Thanks for any help.

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    I don't think so. Seems kind of just like he's saying, "I'm here!"
    – istrasci
    Commented Mar 11, 2020 at 20:46
  • Yeah, also seems like that to me. I'm gonna leave slang interpretations (or lack thereof) up to native speakers, but this is intransitive land, not transitive - no "landing it".
    – Mindful
    Commented Mar 11, 2020 at 20:48

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So this literally translates into "I landed it."

More like "I landed". 上陸 sounds like he came out of the sea, since the 上 implies upwards. For example aircraft etc. are 着陸 rather than 上陸.

In English we might say you "landed something" as in you got a good job or achieved something worthwhile. Is that it?

As far as I know such an expression doesn't exist in Japanese.

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  • +1. 上陸 does not mean "to finish". (As an aside, 上陸 is used as a catchphrase like this, in which case whether the product came by air or by sea does not matter.)
    – naruto
    Commented Mar 12, 2020 at 5:13
  • I don't know for sure but I think "I landed something" comes from fishing terminology so it's like 大漁 in Japanese.
    – user36788
    Commented Mar 12, 2020 at 6:04
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Since I haven't watched this movie (I really liked godzilla vs mothra though), I hope I am not missing the context.

I need help of this entry for 蒲田{かまた}くん on ニコニコ大百科. There is a dialog(probably on the scene) on it.

「この巨大不明生物が上陸することはありませんので、どうかご安心ください」:

"Since this unknown giant creature is not going to land on here, please don't worry about that."

「え、蒲田{かまた}に?」: "On Kamata? Really?"

Reading this dialog, I guess this「蒲田{かまた}くん」was really unlikely to land on Japan, but he landed (maybe done easily because their face seems not be getting exhaust).

So,「上陸したよ」would probably mean "(Don't be surprised!) I've made it to land here!".

The last「よ」is similar to 「ぜ」,but less emphatic.

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