3

In this link, it is explained that shimeru is a transitive verb and so it can take the -te aru ending but shimaru is an intransitive verb so it can take the -te imasu ending.

However, in some grammar textbooks (such as this one here) I have seen shimatte arimasu as well:

使わないものはクローゼットにしまってあります。
Tsukawanai mono wa kurōzetto ni shimatte arimasu.

I leave things that I do not use in my closet.

What is the difference?

3

The structure てある is used to indicate that somebody has of their own volition performed a deliberate preparatory action on an object. Intransitive verbs have no object to perform the action on.

Basically, てある describes states of being which have resulted in an object having been acted on to completion, usually with a specific goal in mind for that object. This is why the transitive verb must be used. Transitive verbs are used to express people (or other agents) 'acting' on an object. Intransitive verbs don't work with てある because there is no direct object onto which the preparatory action can be performed. Put more simply, てある implies an object and a person who did something to it. With intransitive verbs, there is a person but no object.

| improve this answer | |
3

(Using the example sentences from the links you provided.)

使わないものはクローゼットにしまってあります。
tsukawanai mono wa kurōzetto ni shimatte arimasu.

I leave things that I do not use in my closet.

Here しまって is the te-form of the transitive verb しまう "to put away / to store".


窓が[閉まって]{しまって}います。
mado ga shimatte imasu.

The window was/is closed.

Here しまって is the te-form of the intransitive verb 閉まる.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy