3

I'm reading 「さよなら私のクラマー」, and I found this baloon I'm finding hard to understand:

意図がわからないあんたでもないでしょ

The context: the opponent team just scored two goals, and the blond girl is ready to go all out to even the score, but the captain (the black-haired girl) says to wait till the second half of the game, then she says that sentence.

The English translation has "I know you know why the plan is the way it is", but I don't understand it. I was wondering if it can be the ないものでもない form, with 「あんた」 in between, which would mean something like "It's possible that you understand our intention, isn't it?", which is way less strong than the English translation and doesn't really sounds right to me.

If I were to guess, I would translate it something like "It's not like you to not understand our intention", reading 「あんたでもない」 as "It's not like you" and 「意図がわからない」 as "to not understand our intention".

I found a couple of question about 「でもない」 (here and here), but I don't think this example is answered by those.

Here's the page; the ballon on the upper left, which is hard to read, says: 「ダメって!!駄々っ子注意するみたいに」: enter image description here

3

Neither "It's possible that you understand our intention, isn't it?" nor "It's not like you to not understand our intention" work. The tricky thing is that the word-to-word translation of this phrase to English results in an ungrammatical English sentence (English grammar forbids using restrictive relative clause on pronouns), so let me paraphrase.

Regarding "happy", あなた can be in one of the two states: to be happy, or to be unhappy. Similarly, regarding 意図が分かっている, あなた can be in one of the two states: 意図が分かっている or 意図が分からない. By ではない, the captain is negating the possibility that あなた is in the 意図が分からない state. That's why "I know you know why the plan is the way it is" is a valid English translation here.

Edit: As explained in でありません(でない) vs ではありません(ではない) vs でもありません(でもない) , the use of でもない instead of ではない weakens the strength of negation, somewhat analogous to changing from "it's not" into "it's not really".

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Do 「でもない」 and 「ではない」 have the same meaning in this case? In you answer you explain 「ではない」, while in the manga the character uses 「でもない」. – Mauro Feb 24 at 8:46
  • Thanks, I totally forgot to mention that. I edited the post and added it. – Hirotaka Sato Feb 24 at 23:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.