1

While 深い (ふかい) means "profound; deep; dense", 箆 (へら, の), as a noun, means "spatula; arrow shaft" in japanese and, originally, "fine-toothed comb" in chinese.

This word is used adverbially in this sentence:

箆深く射された矢がなかった。

箆深く could mean something like "deep as an arrow" or "arrow-like deep", but would it not be redundant if it appears before 矢?

2

「箆深{のぶか}く射{さ}された矢{や}がなかった。」

「箆{の}」, in this context, means a "bamboo arrow shaft". There is indeed a 「竹」 ("bamboo") radical used at the top of the kanji.

「箆深{のぶか}し」 is an adjective which 大辞林 defines as:

矢が根元{ねもと}まで深くささっている。

"(of an arrow) stuck through (an object)"

「箆深く」 is the 連用形 of 「箆深し」 functioning adverbially. 

The arrow was not there to see.

箆深く could mean something like "deep as an arrow" or "arrow-like deep", but would it not be redundant if it appears before 矢?

I personally see no redundancy here as 「矢」 does not appear directly in the adjective 「箆深く」. 

| improve this answer | |
  • So, could I render this sentence just as "there was no arrow that deeply shined" or should "deeply" have another meaning? – Daniel Dec 4 '19 at 1:49
  • @Daniel Does it really say 射された rather than 刺された. Is this another of this author's weirdnesses? – user3856370 Dec 4 '19 at 8:19
  • Yep, it says so. The book is from 1949, so maybe it wasn't that weird in modern literary japanese. – Daniel Dec 4 '19 at 16:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.