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The dictionary says that 刹那主義 means "principle of living only for the moment" and 快楽主義 means "hedonism/epicureanism", but I also found entries that say epicureanism for the former. I don't think they are interchangeable, but I can't seem to grasp their nuance very well. I found these words in a character's profile and this how his description starts (刹那主義,快楽主義).

Calling the character just hedonistic would be accurate given his personality, but, does it sound alright if I translate as "A hedonist who lives for the pleasure of the moment"?

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If what you want to say by the word "hedonism" is:

living and behaving in ways that mean you get as much pleasure out of life as possible, according to the belief that the most important thing in life is to enjoy yourself

then you understand both words correctly. "Epicureanism" as an English word is a popularized metaphor which is often not even true to the philosophy Epicurus himself had advocated, not to mention translation. (The "real" epicureanism as an ancient Greek philosophy is called エピクロス主義.)

does it sound alright if I translate as "A hedonist who lives for the pleasure of the moment"?

Yes, you are right about this interpretation of 刹那主義, because, as the dictionary says:

過去や将来のことを考えないで、ただ現在の瞬間を充実させて生きればよいとする考え方。また、一時的な快楽を求めようとする考え方。

  • thank you for your input! I thought my interpretation sounded odd, I really needed a second opinion. – Alice B. Rabbit Dec 4 '19 at 16:33

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