4

So I'm reading this sentence:

私は押し入れの奥から、夏の洋服を出して、かばんにいっぱい入れて出かけることにしました。

Basically I understand this sentence as:

Out of the clothes in the closet, I took the Western-style summer clothes out, I put them in the bag (full), then I took them out.

If it's incorrect, please correct me. However, I don't understand why the take out part is so complicated:

出かけることにしました

出かける (the action of taking out) instead of 出る. Then turn it into noun with こと then しました.

8

「私{わたし}は押{お}し入{い}れの奥{おく}から、夏{なつ}の洋服{ようふく}を出{だ}して、かばんにいっぱい入{い}れて出{で}かけることにしました。」

Your translation of that is:

"Out of the clothes in the closet, I took the Western-style summer clothes out, I put them in the bag (full), then I took them out."

Your TL obviously makes little sense. Why would one put clothes in a bag and (immediately) take them out?

「出{で}かける」 means "to go out", "to leave home", etc.

「出{だ}す」 means "to take something out", which you translated correctly.

Thus, it looks like someone is taking a trip, doesn't it?

Moving on to 「ことにする」.

This expression has been discussed many times before so I will be brief.

「Verb + ことにする」

means:

"to decide to [Verb]"

You will encounter this expression over and over again as long as you study Japanese.

My own TL:

"I decided to take my summer clothes out of the closet, stuff my bag with them and leave home."

(「洋服」 surely means "Western-style clothes" literally, but because what 99% of Japanese people wear on a daily basis are such clothes, the word just means "clothes" to us.)

2

dekakeru means to go out, as in for a stroll or to do errands. So the speaker put the clothes in a bag and left the house.

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