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I am reading some old prewar books that smush two kango together to create a complex noun, for example 伝説伝統 for "legends and traditions".

An academic citation, by an author who I am finding a bit dubious, gives Romanizations for such doubled-up kango with a ya in the middle, for example, densetsu ya dentō.

Is this a legitimate way to transcribe the literary reading of doubled-up kango, or is densetsu dentō the correct pronunciation?

edit in reply to naruto: The exact document in question is a Meiji period current events magazine from 1899, but I'm wondering about this general pattern of writing which I've seen over the period 1890-1945

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    "Some old prewar book" is way too vague...what type of book are you reading? Is your book related to kanbun? In what style is it written? – naruto Aug 19 at 15:53
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    @JACK Please don't attempt to answer questions in the comment section. – snailcar Aug 19 at 17:43
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I'm a naitive Japanese speaker. Just let you know my answer is based on my experience, not based on linguistic evidences.

Romanizations for such doubled-up kango with a ya in the middle, for example, densetsu ya dentō.

From my perspective, this statement is questionable. It is true that you can itemize with "ya"(や) (both in written and spoken Japanese), but in such cases we would always spell it out explicitly, that is 伝説や伝統.

However, the "doubled-up kango" itself is not wrong. Sometimes (but not often) we itemize things without using "と" or "や" and its pronunciation is simply, "densetsu dentō." In normal sentences, spelling with ”、” or "・" between (i.e. 伝説・伝統) would be preferable for readability. (Also, it might be my personal articulation style, but I put a short pause between densetsu and dentō.)

I hope this helps.

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