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(I can change the question if it's too vague. ๐Ÿ˜…)

I'm trying to practice my listening comprehension by listening to anime and not fully paying attention to subtitles. For the most part I can understand them but every now and then there will be something that I suppose is so colloquial that I can't find references to the word anywhere. I like looking up the more natural ways people would say things than just book/dictionary forms. (I've been told I'm too stiff...)

One of these is from the anime 'March comes in like a Lion' season 2 episode 13 on Netflix. (For the source reference)

Rei the main character sits down about 14:50 and says under his breath something like "iya (or iye) korakusho" like when you'd sit down and go "oh boy/man" or "ah whew" or something to that effect in English, this traslates it as "ooph" in the subtitles though...

I've heard this in many other anime over the years and it's one I can never find a reference to or how it's used exactly.

Ive tried every single similar combination I could think of of kana/kanji to research and I can only think that crowd sourcing is my last option. I know this forum is very strict but I hope that my obscure/colloquial reference can be answered.

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Looking at the subtitles on Netflix, it's ใ‚ˆใฃใ“ใ‚‰ใ—ใ‚‡ใฃใจ, which seems to be a variation on ใ‚ˆใฃใ“ใ‚‰ใ—ใ‚‡, which you can find in dictionaries. As you understood, it's something said when exerting effort.

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  • That was fast! Was that on US Netflix? I didn't even think to look and see if it had Japanese subtitles, it's like 2 in the morning! I'm embarrassed ๐Ÿ˜ณ
    – Hush
    Aug 12, 2019 at 6:44
  • @Kyoumimasu I'm in Japan, so I'm not sure what is on the US Netflix. It probably isn't available there.
    – Leebo
    Aug 12, 2019 at 6:45
  • ใ‚ใ‚ŠใŒใจใ†ใ”ใ–ใ„ใพใ™ ๐Ÿ™‡๐Ÿปโ€โ™€๏ธ the phrase I hear most here is ใ‚ˆใ— or ใ‚ˆใฃใ—ใ‚ƒใ€œ or ใŠใ„ใ—ใ‚‡ใ€œ from Japanese-Americans ๐Ÿ˜Š
    – Hush
    Aug 12, 2019 at 6:53

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