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This was mentioned in our class but for the life of me, I cannot recall the exact sentence. I only recall that it was even more 'romantic' or better than だいすきです since it means 'I love your everything', if I recall correctly.

How is this said in Japanese?

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I recommend 「月がきれいですね」by Natume Souseki(夏目漱石).

When he was an English teacher in school, one day Mr. Natume Souseki asked his students to translate an essay into Japanese. There is a scene that the hero can't help saying 'I love you' to the heroine when they walk under the moonlight. A student translated it directly into 「愛してる」, But Mr. Natume Souseki said that the Japanese would not say so, 'It should be more subtle and implicit.' Students asked how to say that. Natsume Soseki meditated for a moment and told the students that it was enough to say 「月がきれいですね」(the moonlight tonight is beautiful.)

I'm not good at writing in English. So if you ask me why it does, I can only say if you're dating someone you really like, the sky turns blue, the flower will open, the bird will sing and the moonlight will be beautiful. And it all because of the man standing with you.

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well, if you mean 愛{あい}してる(よ), it's a veeerry deep and romantic thing to say and you probably wouldn't want to say it too carelessly... ESPECIALLY in public. If a regular Japanese person heard you say that they'd probably definitely be weirded out, especially since they are typically opposed to PDAs, often not very "lovey dovey" (in our sense) in public or sometimes even private places. They'd probably get super flustered... this is from what I've heard from various sources (natives and foreigners who've experienced these matters), so just pointing it out. Lets just say that their ideals and opinions on romance and love differ in some ways to us and some others.

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