9

Some websites online show the fifth stroke as a vertical line straight down connected to the sixth stroke, while others (and in Chinese) have it as a downward diagonal dash. Is there are difference between the two?

Similarly, is the first stroke in 高 connected to the second or a diagonal dash?

Is this always the case whenever a Kanji has something similar to these two?

9

It's the difference between printing, handwriting, and calligraphy.

This element, called nabebuta or keisankanmuri (亠), should be connected and vertical for more formal (printed) styles, and will normally be disconnected and 'diagonal' for calligraphic styles and many handwritten styles.

There is not right or wrong unless you are talking about a particular font style.

When practicing kanji early on, it is normally recommended to stick to a more 'standard' style, like Kyokashotai (thanks @drooze).

10

For the Kanji 校 is the fifth stroke connected to the sixth stroke?

Depends on the country's prescribed standard.

Some websites online show the fifth stroke as a vertical line straight down connected to the sixth stroke

Japanese regular script handwriting prescribes this shape to be taught in schools.

  • enter image description here

    HG Kyokashotai

while others (and in Chinese) have it as a downward diagonal dash.

Actual handwriting (that you'll find outside of schools) will have a variation.

Chinese kids are also taught in schools to write in this way.

  • enter image description here

    中華民國教育部標準楷書

Is there are difference between the two?

  • In terms of comprehension, no.

  • If you're taking a Japanese written exam, they might get picky and deduct marks.

  • 1
    Indeed – in Chinese, the fifth stroke in the character 校 is a 丶 (点 diǎn ‘dot’), not a 丨 (竖 shù ‘vertical line’), and writing it as the latter would definitely count as a mistake, if you write clearly enough that the difference can be seen. I never noticed that Japanese treats it differently before! – Janus Bahs Jacquet Mar 6 at 18:01

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