4

In the following sentence:

ふつ~怒られるんじゃないかぁ~?

For context, the speaker has been beaten and is responding to the victory interview of the one who defeated him, which contains a lot of heartwarming stuff like how he's just happy he could keep a promise he made to his father. The speaker is accompanied by at least one other person (who also lost), but probably by more.

[EDIT: to better explain the context, because the above is faulty.

  • C defeats A and B.
  • C is interviewed by D.
  • A (and B) watch the interview.
  • A comments (to B?) on what C says in the interview.]

What is ふつ? The one guess I have at present that sort of makes sense is the affectionate meaning of 仏, so that it would be "How adorable~Ah, we can't possibly be mad at this, right~?" But as far as I understand that would require the ほとけ reading.

Sort of a backup guess is that it's short for ふつふつ, but if so I don't know how to apply that.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Reading through the comments, I'm sorry for the trouble I've caused. I'm very grateful for all the help I've been given and I hope you all have a nice day.

  • Apologies, but I don't think ~ is ー. The lettertype used has a very clear difference between any and all stripes (~, ー (katakana), and 一 (kanji)) and on top of that, ~ has in no other line been used as a substitute for an elongated sound (on it's own, anyway). Maybe I'm not getting what you're saying? – Andrea Jan 26 at 8:24
  • So the speaker on question is C, and speaking to him/herself or another person? – Kentaro Jan 26 at 8:47
  • @KentaroTomono In my edit, the speaker is A. C is being spoken about. And B responds to A with ボクもそう思うネ… – Andrea Jan 26 at 8:56
9

The word you're seeing is ふつ~, which is 普通【ふつう】 ("normally", "usually") written in a slangy/sloppy way. This is not a tilde but a wave dash, which is used in place of a standard long vowel marker (ー). Notice the width of the character. In vertical writing it's rotated 90 degrees. You can write like おか~さん instead of おかあさん, そ~です instead of そうです, and so on (never do this in formal settings.) 仏 has nothing to do with this sentence.

A: ふつ~怒られるんじゃないかぁ~
A: Normally, I guess he (the interviewee, C) would be scolded (if he says such a thing)?


Here's the relevant explanation from Wikipedia:

Japanese punctuation

Wave Dash

The wave dash 〜 (波ダッシュ nami dasshu, wave dash) resembles a lengthened tilde (FULLWIDTH TILDE), which does not exist in JIS X 0208.

Uses in Japanese include:

  • To indicate a long or drawn-out vowel (ですよね〜 or あ〜〜〜), usually for comic or cute effect
  • I'm starting to see where the gaps in my understanding are located (as others point out too, I might very well be getting the sentence's subjects mixed up). I'm going back to my translation and review some things. If I don't leave another comment, my problem has been solved. Thanks everyone for all the help! – Andrea Jan 26 at 11:13
  • @Andrew Naruto's answer is O.K. So I will upvote too. By the way, next time you ask the question, could you simplify the "context" thing as much as possible? Otherwise, at the start I had no idea who is the speaker and his/her relationship with father and others was a complete puzzle.lol. – Kentaro Jan 26 at 11:29
  • 1
    @KentaroTomono I will! I did not handle this well at all and I'll make sure it'll be better a next time. Thank you all for your patience! – Andrea Jan 26 at 11:42
0

This is easy as pie.

Here, ふつ~ is the Japanese colloquial version of Kanji 普通{ふつう}, meaning typically, normally, ordinarily, naturally etc etc.

So I was provided with more context by the OP at edited version, saying,

C defeats A and B.

C is interviewed by D.

A (and B) watch the interview.

A comments (to B?) on what C says in the interview.]

And at the comment line,

@KentaroTomono In my edit, the speaker is A. C is being spoken about. And B responds to A with ボクもそう思うネ…

Then the conversation? utterance? would be like this, I think.

A, the defeated speaker, is speaking to B, ( not to himself probably ( because in the edit, it is described "corresponds to B?" )).

And I am sorry, I was a bit perplexed who is scolded, so that is the speaker A talking about C's attitude? Then

"Normally C is gonna be yelled at ( by his father ) ( or by his master? ) later if C says such a thing"?

( And B is responding to A with ボクもそう思うネ… )

And yes, ふつ~ is a bit of colloquial version of ふつう/普通{ふつう}.

仏{ふつ} means France in old usage by the way.

And

Sort of a backup guess is that it's short for ふつふつ, but if so I don't know how to apply that.

ふつふつ is the Japanese Hiragana of 沸々{ふつふつ}, in which you can imagine hot water simmering, so there is nothing to do with this "conversation".

Thank you.

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