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The phrase is: mada minu kimi e tsudzuku. I believe the kana is: まだ見ぬきみへつづく

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    Using kanji, it is まだ見ぬ君へ続く.
    – user458
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 13:05
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    possible duplicate of About negative form {-ず} and {-ぬ}
    – Flaw
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 14:33
  • @Flaw I disagree. Only because I didn't even know what the word was to begin with. Much less it was a literary form of the negative form of a verb.
    – dotnetN00b
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 17:24
  • youtube.com/watch?v=hrGOB2WMJB8&t=1m13s
    – user458
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 23:14
  • @sawa-san, いい曲~~(でも槙原敬之?)
    – user1016
    Commented Jul 31, 2012 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

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見ぬ is the archaic/literary form of 見ない, the negative form of the verb 見る, to see/meet. So I think the whole sentence literally translates to "(Something: "the road" or something I guess) leads to you, whom I've not seen yet"

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  • All the lyrics if that helps.
    – dotnetN00b
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 13:57
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    わ!かたかな!www OK I'll read this page ^^ kasi-time.com/item-9825.html
    – user1016
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 14:01
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    Adding the keyword 歌詞 is a good way to find lyrics in Japanese. Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 14:02
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    @Chocolate It doesn't seem like it
    – dotnetN00b
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 14:36
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    I think song lyrics are often so profound and abstract, and hard to fully understand...
    – user1016
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 15:11
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In most cases 'minu' translates to 'unseen'.

The full sentence まだ見ぬ君へ続く can be roughly translated to "(It) still continues unseen to you"

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    The まだ modifies the verb 見ぬ, not 続く. So it's not "still" but "(not) yet"
    – user1016
    Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 13:54
  • You're right. Don't know how I missed that :P Commented Jul 30, 2012 at 14:03

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