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I'm doing some research on Japanese streets for an art project. I've been looking at pictures of streets and trying to figure out what the characters are,

I'm able to find the first two - to and ma, but the last character differs in some images and I am confused.

I'm just trying to figure out what it says for accuracy. Could someone tell me what the last characters are in these two images and what both of them say when put with to and ma.

enter image description here enter image description here

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    Both signs say 止まれ = とまれ = tomare. It means 'stop'. But please note that questions like this are considered off-topic on this site and are likely to be closed. – user3856370 Nov 13 '18 at 16:21
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    Isn't this question about allographic difference of れ besides the recognition? – broccoli forest Nov 14 '18 at 1:50
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    This question has nothing to do with allographs. – kandyman Nov 16 '18 at 14:27
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Both signs say 止【と】まれ (tomare). That is the intransitive form of the verb to stop. For what I know, it's not a case of allography. Only a matter of different fonts.

  • intransitive form -- You meant to type "imperative form", no..? – Chocolate Nov 27 '18 at 23:31
  • No. Intransitive as not having a direct object. The opposite is transitive (that has a direct object). Here, I found an explanation in this answer: japanese.stackexchange.com/a/30824/32062 – Hige Nov 28 '18 at 0:33
  • 止まれ is the imperative form of 止まる which is an intransitive verb. There is no 'intransitive form'. There are transitive verbs and intransitive verbs, both of which have various conjugations collectively known as 'forms'. – kandyman Nov 28 '18 at 18:33
  • @kandyman Of course, I didn't mean 'form' in that way. 'To stop' can be both, transitive and intransitive. I was trying to point that in this case, it was the intransitive one. Please go ahead and edit, if you will – Hige Nov 28 '18 at 20:13

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