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In this sentence I don't understand the beginning "どうせ 本人と似て軽薄でキラキラしただけの---" For me it's : Anyway, they look alike, brilliant and frivolous But I'm not sure. Could someone please help me ?

And if someone could explain to me the meaning of だけの in the end of sentence, does it have the same meaning as "だけ" or does it mean something else.

the page concerned

  • だけの in the end of sentence? Usually that's not the case, and this should be part of a longer sentence. Is this a manga? What's the context, and who does 本人 refer to? – naruto Oct 17 '18 at 16:11
  • Yes, it's part of a manga. The first sentences is that "いくらお眼鏡にかなったて言ったってぜったい情夫贔屓してるだろ" – orlane Oct 17 '18 at 16:23
  • the main character talks about his favorite teacher who recognizes the talent of one of these students but in fact this teacher is dating this student – orlane Oct 17 '18 at 16:29
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  • 本人: "the person themself", "that person" (if the whole sentence is about the teacher, this 本人 perhaps refers to the student.)
  • と: a particle that marks a comparison target. See this and this.
  • 似て: the te-form of 似る ("to resemble", "to become similar")

The verb 似る takes both に and と. ~に似る and ~と似る are interchangeable, but maybe the latter is slightly more colloquial. So 本人と似て is "being like that person" or "similarly to him/her".

  • 軽薄で: "frivolous (and)"
  • キラキラしただけ: Literally "merely shining" or "only flashy". In this case it describes how someone looks fabulous but has no substance (cf. チャラい).
  • の: the noun linking particle

This type of の does not usually come at the end of the sentence. It's an incomplete sentence ("frivolous and superficial..."), and it probably modifies a person mentioned in a adjacent balloon. Maybe 情夫? I need more context.

  • he is at an exhibition in which the student (teacher's lover) participates. He thinks while looking for the painting that the student exposes, at the end of the bubble that I don't understand there is a line and the next bubble is "あれかな" It's a shame we can't put an image on it. It would be easier. – orlane Oct 18 '18 at 11:57
  • @orlane Oh, so is this a comment on a painting of the student? You can put an image. You can post an image. – naruto Oct 19 '18 at 0:44

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