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https://youtu.be/tdiMAnRekgs?t=4m37s

開けるのに時間を要します. Translated in a Japanese teaching video as "It takes some time to open".

From what I understand, it has meanings of despite/although and the like. Then, why is it translated that way? The best I could come up with is "Despite/Although opening/trying to open it, it takes time" which makes zero sense. Because if you are opening it, wouldn't it already be open? Does it have some other meaning somewhere? I can't find it.

Could you use 開けている instead since you are in the process of opening it right now? Are there alternatives to using のに? How about these? 開ける事が頑張ってんの二                         開ける途中のに

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    のに can also mean 'in order to ...' – user3856370 Apr 8 '18 at 22:09
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In this case, the の and the に are not together, but are separate particles. [verb]-の makes a verb an infinitive: to [verb]. The に is the particle connecting the infinitive to the rest of the sentence.

So you can break the sentence up into: [開]{あ}けるの and に[時間]{じかん}を[要]{よう}します

"To open" "takes time".

From what I understand, it has meanings of despite/although and the like.

It does, but that is a different usage.

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