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https://youtu.be/tdiMAnRekgs?t=4m37s

開けるのに時間を要します. Translated in a Japanese teaching video as "It takes some time to open".

From what I understand, it has meanings of despite/although and the like. Then, why is it translated that way? The best I could come up with is "Despite/Although opening/trying to open it, it takes time" which makes zero sense. Because if you are opening it, wouldn't it already be open? Does it have some other meaning somewhere? I can't find it.

Could you use 開けている instead since you are in the process of opening it right now? Are there alternatives to using のに? How about these? 開ける事が頑張ってんの二                         開ける途中のに

marked as duplicate by Chocolate grammar Apr 9 '18 at 3:03

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    のに can also mean 'in order to ...' – user3856370 Apr 8 '18 at 22:09
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In this case, the の and the に are not together, but are separate particles. [verb]-の makes a verb an infinitive: to [verb]. The に is the particle connecting the infinitive to the rest of the sentence.

So you can break the sentence up into: [開]{あ}けるの and に[時間]{じかん}を[要]{よう}します

"To open" "takes time".

From what I understand, it has meanings of despite/although and the like.

It does, but that is a different usage.

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