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From this article about a roof top walkway on Japan's tallest building:

このアトラクションには、展望台に入る料金1000円が必要です。
For this attraction you need (to pay) 1000 yen which includes the fee for going on the viewing platform.

More literally, "For this attraction, with the fee for going on the viewing platform, 1000 yen is needed"

I'm not at all convinced I've understood this sentence correctly. In particular I'm unsure what the meaning of と is here. I'm treating it as 'with'. So if I pay 1000 yen I can go to the attraction and go on the viewing platform? But I thought the attraction was just the viewing platform so if my translation is correct then 展望台に入る料金と seems redundant.

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    That is fairly clumsy Japanese if you want to know the truth. – l'électeur Mar 3 '18 at 1:02
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This と means "and". It means "For this attraction you need (to pay) the fee for going on the viewing platform and 1000 yen."

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    Just to make sure I understand you correctly, it means "In addition to the fee for going on the viewing platform, you have to pay a further 1000 Yen in order to be allowed on the walkway". Is this how you understand it? – user3856370 Mar 2 '18 at 17:40
  • Yes, that's right. – Yuuichi Tam Mar 2 '18 at 17:45
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    The 展望台 mentioned here is the standard (presumably indoor) viewing area on the 60th floor, which requires a fee for entry. You can then pay the additional 1000-yen fee from there to access the new rooftop walk attraction. (This sounds pretty similar to the setup at other famous tall buildings - Roppongi Hills has the indoor "Tokyo City View" area and then the additional-cost "Sky Deck" on the actual roof, and the Tokyo Skytree also has a main observation deck from which you can pay an additional fee to access another one higher up.) – Ben Roffey Mar 2 '18 at 17:46

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