1

These sentences seem unnatural to me, but I have trouble putting my finger on why.  

私の家のそばにはあまりありません
There's not much by my house 

私の家の近くにたくさんあります。
there is a lot close to my house

I feel that they need to have a subject to sound like good Japanese (they don't sound too good in english eiter TBH), but now I have been looking at them for so long that they start to make sense again. Are these sentences ok, or should they be changed around, and if so how?

2
  • 1
    If there's no implied noun from the context, I would rather put it as 何もありません / なんでもあります or similar (these can be nuanced a bit, as now they are really black-white), otherwise I would feel like something is missing. Where did you get these sentences from? – a20 Jan 15 '18 at 13:57
  • From my students. They still have limited grammar and vocab to work with, and these variations show up when they try to write about where they live. I'm just trying to find a good way to explain to them why this doesn't work well. :) – Aniva Jan 15 '18 at 19:31
5

English

私の家のそばにはあまりありません。

In the above sentence, it is unknown "what" there isn't, so it is incomplete as a sentence. However, in the case of a conversation between A and B as follows, B-1 is a perfect sentence, but from the context it is clear that they are talking about "Ramen shop", so it is normal for B to use the sentence with B-2 instead of B-1.

私の家の近くにたくさんあります。

In the above sentence, it is unknown "what" there are a lot of, so it is incomplete as a sentence. However, in the case of a conversation between A and B as follows, B-1 is a perfect sentence, but from the context it is clear that they are talking about "Ramen shop", so it is normal for B to use the sentence with B-2 instead of B-1.

A: どこかにラーメン屋がありますか。
B-1: 私の家の近くにラーメン屋がたくさんあります。
B-2: 私の家の近くにたくさんあります。

日本語

私の家のそばにはあまりありません。

上記{じょうき}の文{ぶん}では、「何{なに}が」ないのか不明{ふめい}ですので文としては不完全{ふかんぜん}です。
しかし、次{つぎ}のようにAさんとBさんとの会話{かいわ}の場合{ばあい}は、B-1は完全{かんぜん}な文ですが、文脈{ぶんみゃく}から「ラーメン屋{や}」の話{はなし}をしていることが明白{めいはく}なので、BさんがB-1の代{か}わりにB-2という文を使{つか}うことは普通{ふつう}におこなわれます。

A: 私の家のそばにはラーメン屋がたくさんあります。
B-1: 私の家のそばにはラーメン屋はあまりありません。
B-2: 私の家のそばにはあまりありません。

私の家の近くにたくさんあります。

上記の文では、「何が」たくさんあるのか不明ですので文としては不完全です。
しかし、次のようにAさんとBさんとの会話の場合は、B-1は完全な文ですが、文脈から「ラーメン屋」の話をしていることが明白なので、BさんがB-1の代わりにB-2という文を使うことは普通におこなわれます。

A: どこかにラーメン屋がありますか。
B-1: 私の家の近くにラーメン屋がたくさんあります。
B-2: 私の家の近くにたくさんあります。

4
  • そのように思ったが、はっきりわからなかったんだ。これでわかった!ありがとうございます!代わりに何が言えるかなー?あまり何もありませんとかは? – Aniva Jan 15 '18 at 19:40
  • 英語で失礼します。あまり何もない would be 'Not much of nothing', which would still mean 'nothing'. There cannot be degrees of nothingness. For that reason it would be wrong. ほとんど何もない would be 'Almost nothing', which would work. – BJCUAI Jan 15 '18 at 21:12
  • @Aniva: 「あまり何もありません」は、次のようなときにAさんがBさんに対して使います。昔から良く知っているBさんがAさんの家に久しぶりにたずねて来ました(=訪問しました)。Aさん:「お久ぶりです。何もありませんがゆっくりしていってください。」 この場合Bさんが遠方から来た人の場合は、「何もありせんが」は、「ご馳走は何もありませんが」というニュアンスを持っています。実際には、AさんはBさんに食事を出す意思があり、また、BさんがAさんの家に宿泊することを提案しています。Bさんが近所の場合は、「何もありませんが」は、AさんがBさんにお茶やお菓子を出し、そして、Bさんとゆっくり会話したいと思っています。 – mackygoo Jan 16 '18 at 1:55
  • @Aniva: 上記のコメントのような場合、実際には何かあるのですが、遠慮して「あまり何もありませんが」と言いますが、更に、「あまり何もありませんが」より「何もありませんが」の方がよく使われます。実際には「提供できる何かがある」のですが、「何もありませんが」という表現が普通に使われます。日本語はむずかしいですね。 – mackygoo Jan 16 '18 at 2:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.