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I have a sentence like this:

今はその解決に色々とアプローチをかけとる感じでして 

試作機のテストをCら共々 手伝わせてもろてる感じなんです

It's a part of dialogue where A is giving a report to person B about progress on her project. Although this is a bit in media res, as in we cut into this conversation right at this line.

But anyway. I'm wondering what 感じでして and 感じなんです (which is probably 感じなのです) are meant to convey. I imagine it's supposed to mean that A thinks/feels these things? Like

Right now, I feel trying various approaches to solving the problem (will help?)

and I also feel all of C to help with prototype testing (will help?)

I assume the help bit is to be assumed from context, since they are talking about a project?

What I'm also wondering is, is she PROPOSING this course of action? Or is she saying, like, that she feels geting C's aid in testing is helping them?

Oh and of course is there a meaning difference between 感じなんする, 感じでして?

Like the former is more of a statement of feeling, but the later?

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These instances of 感じ don't contribute much to the content of the sentence. They are almost like fillers, like the English "like". Hence this translation:

Right now, I'm, like, trying various approach to solving the problem and, like, helping with the prototype testing, with C and others, you know.

The meaning wouldn't change if they were removed and the sentence went like this:

今はその解決に色々とアプローチをかけとりまして 

試作機のテストをCら共々 手伝わせてもろてるんです

except that now the speaker would sound less like a person who's not totally sure about what she's talking about.

The usual semantic difference between ~(な)んです and ~です (of which ~でして is the te-form) is the that former has an explanatory tone (meaning it indicates a statement is offered as an explanation for a given state of affairs), which the latter doesn't have.

But in this case the difference in form is due to the fact that the sentence in question consists of two coordinate clauses and only the latter needs to be in the なんです form to give the whole sentence an explanatory tone.

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