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I can't find the difference and in the book that I use there is no explanation.


Context: It is about ordering food. I have two sentences:

ミルクと砂糖入りの紅茶はいくらですか。
ホットコーヒーをミルクと砂糖入りでください。

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    What's the context? Are you talking about phrases for ordering food, like 「ピクルスぬきのハンバーガー」 vs 「ハンバーガー、ピクルスぬきで」、「ワサビいりの鉄火巻き」vs 「鉄火巻き、ワサビ入りで」?? – Chocolate Jan 4 '18 at 11:41
  • Yes, It is about ordering food, I have two sentence. One is ミルクと砂糖入りの紅茶はいくらですか。And the second one is ホットコーヒーをミルクと砂糖入りでください。 – Hotondo Dantenshi Jan 4 '18 at 18:08
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Generally speaking, ~で is always adverbial (i.e., modifies a verb), whereas ~の always connects to the following noun. In English this distinction is not always clear because "with ~", "to ~", "in ~" and so on can modify both a noun and a verb.

  • ワサビ抜きで寿司を食べた。 I ate sushi without wasabi; I ate, without wasabi, sushi.
  • ワサビ抜きで寿司 (sounds like an incomplete sentence fragment because there is no verb for 抜きで to modify)
  • ワサビ抜きの寿司を食べた。 I ate sushi without wasabi; I ate wasabi-free sushi.
  • ワサビ抜きの寿司 wasabi-free sushi (noun phrase)

When you order something, you can say, for example:

ミルク入りでください。
ミルク入りでお願いします。
With milk, please.

...because ください/お願いします is a verb. You can omit this verb and say this simply:

ミルク入り
With milk (, please).

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I think you should provide the sentence in the book to get a nice answer.

Probably your book contains the sentence like “彼抜きの会議はつまらない。” or “彼抜きで会議はつまらない” The former normally implies “the meeting without him is boring.”. The latter normally implies “Having a meeting without him is boring.”

Hopefully you could provide some sentences for the distinction 入りの/入りで.

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  • Thank you for the tip. It´s my first time posting a question. I have two sentence. One is ミルクと砂糖入りの紅茶はいくらですか。And the second one is ホットコーヒーをミルクと砂糖入りでください。 – Hotondo Dantenshi Jan 4 '18 at 18:09
  • You need to add it into your question to get a nice answer. You can edit your question. – user25382 Jan 4 '18 at 22:06

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