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The sentence

私のことを好きにならない人が好きみたい

means "I like someone who doesn't like me back", but someone said to me that it means "I try liking someone who doesn't like me".

Which is correct?

  • someone said to me -- The someone is not a native speaker of Japanese, right? – Chocolate Dec 24 '17 at 2:49
  • yes,he is my friend – sai ten Dec 24 '17 at 3:00
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Your friend's translation is incorrect, I'm afraid. The みたい here means "(It) looks like~~" "(It) seems like~~", not "try doing~~". (It's the auxiliary (助動詞) 「みたい(だ)」. I guess your friend is confusing it with 「te-form + みたい」, which consists of the subsidiary verb (補助動詞) 「みる」 + the auxiliary 「たい」, meaning "I want to try doing~~".)

「私のことを好きにならない人が好き(だ/です)」 (without みたい) would mean "I like someone who doesn't/won't like me back" or "I like the people who don't/won't like me back."

With the ~みたい, your sentence means:

私のことを好きにならない人が好きみたい
"It looks like I (tend to) like someone who doesn't/won't like me back."
"I seem to like someone who doesn't/won't like me back."
or "I seem to like the people who don't/won't like me back."

  • 1
    It could also mean "I seem to like people/guys/girls that don't like me back", right? – Earthliŋ Dec 24 '17 at 9:19
  • @Earthliŋ Yes, the 人 can be plural, too. (この質問→ japanese.stackexchange.com/q/55366/9831 で文脈を見たあとだったんで、単数だけ書いてしまいました。。) – Chocolate Dec 25 '17 at 5:40

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