1

Coming across lines such as (two separate contexts):

「ご飯をよそってきて食べなよ」

and

「そんなに驚かないで。頭を冷やすために下でお茶でも淹れてくるよ」

I'm having trouble understanding the usage of 来る in both of these sentences.

I was told that the former sentence, 来る functions as an auxiliary (which makes sense in the surrounding context, since it isn't indicated that the person being told needed to move between different locations), but am then a little confused what it specifically functions as (besides perhaps,"to come to serving their rice", "to start serving their rice").

The second sentence seems much more clear with 来る functioning as a full verb, "to brew tea and return", "to go brew tea", but with how I understand the first line, I started getting second doubts here and thought that it could function as an auxiliary also, "to come to brew tea", "to start brewing tea."

Is there a general rule of thumb for particular verbs used with てくる, or is it solely reliant on context? Any clarification would be greatly appreciated, as well as correcting any misunderstandings I might have with 来る.

  • It's impossible to translate よそってくる into "to start serving rice". – user4092 Dec 15 '17 at 9:16
3

「ご飯{はん}をよそってきて食{た}べなよ。」

「そんなに驚{おどろ}かないで。頭{あたま}を冷{ひや}やすために下{した}でお茶{ちゃ}でも淹{い}れてくるよ。」

First of all, 「くる」 in both sentences is a subsidiary verb, which is why it is written in kana in both. When used as a "regular" verb, it will certainly be written using the kanji as 「来{く}る」, 「来{き}て」 etc. because it is such a simple kanji that even the 1st-graders can read and write.

「Verb in てーform + くる」 means:

"to (verb) and come back (to where one was)"

In other words, the place where one can perform the action described by the verb is at least a few steps away from where one is.

The sentences in question mean, respectively,:

"Why dontcha go scoop some rice (and come back here) and eat it."

"No panic! I'll go make some tea downstairs (and return) so it'll cool you down."

Both the rice and the tea are at least a few steps away, correct?

If the rice were located right where one was like right on the table where one was sitting, one would not say the first sentence. Why not? That is because no "returning" would be needed. One would simply say without a 「きて」:

「ご飯をよそって食べなよ。」

Similarly, if the tea leaves and (hot) water were right where one was, the second sentence would be:

「頭を冷やすためにお茶でも淹れるよ。」

as "going downstairs (and returning upstairs)" would be unnecessary. I dropped the 「下で」 and 「くる」.

Off the top of my head, the only verbs that the subsidiary verb 「いく」 or 「くる」 could not be attached to would be 「ある」, 「いる」 and 「来る」. There might be more, so please add if someone can think of other verbs.

It is correct to say 「行ってくる」, which is why we say 「行ってきます。」 when leaving home for work or school.

  • With the first sentence, the immediate line following after talked about the person in question coming towards the table (テーブルに近づこうとするこころだが、僕から距離をとろうともしていて、妙な横歩きになっている。), which is why I immediately thought of the other interpretation. But I suppose that's the writer finding it unnecessary to mention she went somewhere else and returned. – user26484 Dec 15 '17 at 6:49
0

Is there a general rule of thumb for particular verbs used with てくる, or is it solely reliant on context?

Both.

l'électeurさんの回答は大変分かりやすいですが、そのままで問題ない部分(〇)と、少し違う(X~△)と思われるところがあります。

〇 (1) First of all, 「くる」 in both sentences is a subsidiary verb,
〇 (2) which is why it is written in kana in both.
X~△ (3)「Verb in てーform + くる」 means: "to (verb) and come back (to where one was)"
〇 (4) In other words, the place where one can perform the action described by the verb is at least a few steps away from where one is.

(3)でX~△を付けた理由は、補助動詞の「くる」には「今、居るところから離れたところである動作/行為をする」のは確かですが、「ここに戻ってくるかどうか」は必ずしも確かではなく、文脈によって当然戻る場合もあり、また文脈によっては戻ることまで言及していない場合もあります。むしろ、戻ることを意識していないあるいは言及していない場合の方が多いように思います。

「ご飯をよそってきて食べなよ。」の場合は、今、ここで食事中(ご飯を食べている途中)なので「ご飯をよそった」あとは、ここに戻って来て食べるのは当然です。 また、「頭を冷やすために下でお茶でも淹れてくるよ。」の場合も、今はここで相手と話をしているので、お茶を淹れたあと、淹れたお茶を持ってここに戻って来るの当然です。

しかし、「行ってきます」の場合は、確かに学校の授業や会社の仕事が終わったら戻って来るでしょうが、この発言をしたときに、戻って来る時のことまで言及しているとは思えません。長期の旅行に出かけるときにも家を出るときに「行ってきます」と言います。このとき「戻って来る」ときのことまで意識はないと思います。

同様に、「遊んできます」「散歩してきます」「友達に会ってきます」など、多くの「~てくる」の場合、いつかは戻って来るでしょうが、発言したときに「ここに戻って来る」ことまでは言及していないと思います。

「~てくる」に関して別の表現を紹介します。それは「~ておいで」あるいは「~といで」です。「~といで」は「~ておいで」の発音が変化したものです。

「おいで!」は、ご存知のように英語では "Come on!" に相当し、「来なさい!/来い!」と言う意味です。 「来る」と「来い」。似ていますね。 「おいで」も「くる」と同様に補助動詞です。

「くる」と「おいで」との一番の違いは、「~てくる」は基本的に自分の行為に対して使います。一方「~ておいで」は二人称の相手に対して「ここから離れた場所で二人称の人に対してある動作/行為をするように促{うなが}す」場合に使います。 以下に例を示します。

「(私は)ご飯をよそってくる」⇔「(あなた、)ご飯をよそっておいで」/「よそっといで」
「(私は)お茶を淹れてくる」⇔「(あなた、)お茶を淹れておいで」/「淹れといで」
「(私は)行ってくる」⇔「(あなた、)行っておいで」/「行っといで」
「(私は)遊んでくる」⇔「(あなた、)遊んでおいで」/「遊んどいで」
「(私は)散歩してくる」⇔「(あなた、)散歩しておいで」/「散歩しといで」
「(私は)友達に会ってくる」⇔「(あなた、)友達に会っておいで」/「会っといで」

「~ておいで」も「~てくる」と同様に、ここから離れた場所での行動/動作ですが、ここに戻ってくることまでは言及していない場合の方が多いように思います。

  • 2
    X~△ (3)「Verb in てーform + くる」 means: "to (verb) and come back (to where one was)" <-- でも・・明鏡国語辞典の「くる」の補助動詞の項目には『~した後で、(また) そこに来る意を表す。「文句を言ってくる」「顔を洗って出直してこい」』、デジタル大辞泉にも『ある動作をしてもとに戻る。…しに行って帰る。「買い物に行ってくる」「外国の事情をつぶさに見てこようと思っている」』って書いてありますが・・ – Chocolate Dec 15 '17 at 16:38
  • @Chocolate: 言葉は生きています。そのように定義されていることは百も承知です。論理的にはそうですが、しゃべっている当人はどこまでそのとき論理的に考えているかです。生きている日本人は、是非辞書を超えたニュアンスを伝えましょう。私はこの「てくる」は「動詞+てくる」の「動詞」を、とっさには良い表現が浮かびませんが、単に動詞だけのときに比べて、現地で実際に「行って経験する」「行って試す」のようなニュアンスの方が、「戻ってくる」以上の重みで使われているように思っています。私は、そのニュアンスを伝えたかったのです。 – mackygoo Dec 15 '17 at 23:55
  • @Chocolate: しかし、上記の辞書の定義がいつも違っているとは思っておりません。「お茶を淹れてくる」、「ご飯をよそってくる」の場合は明らかに「戻って来る」ことの意味が入っております。どのような時に「戻る」ニュアンスが含まれるかどうか判断するには「言葉にとらわれず」あるいは「文字通りの翻訳」ではなく「意訳」をすると分かります。「行ってきます / 行ってくる」「それなら、俺が話をつけてくる」という表現を意訳してください。"return" あるいは "come back" というニュアンスを何とか入れようとしますか。 – mackygoo Dec 16 '17 at 0:24
  • 1
    ・・・意訳してください。"return" あるいは "come back" というニュアンスを何とか入れようとしますか -- なんで「意訳」しないといけないんですか?「意訳」で訳出されないものは意味がないんですか?質問者は「てくる」の意味を聞いているわけで、意訳の仕方なんか聞いてません。逆に、戻ってこない場合には「てくる」を付けないでしょう?それは「てくる」に意味があるからですよね。訳出されなくても「‌​てくる」には意味があるんです。英語で直訳‌​して表現しない日本語のニュアンスはたくさ‌​んあります。「参加させていただきます 」「逃げやがった 」などにも、通常英語には訳出しないけれど意味があります。l'électeurさんも明鏡も大辞泉もそういう、「~てくる」が‌​持つ「意味」を説明してるんです。 – Chocolate Dec 16 '17 at 3:01
  • 1
    (・・・それにしても、複数の国語辞典と全く同じことを書いたのに、×とか違うとか言われるってどうなんだろう・・・) – Chocolate Dec 16 '17 at 3:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.