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I wanted to tell a friend about a time when I had to get a dental filling. My instinct was to use 受ける or もらう, but Google tells me this is incorrect. Would I simply say:

去年、歯が詰め物した。

or perhaps

去年、歯が詰め物してしまった。

Furthermore, what actually happened was I had to have a filling replaced. Is this correct?

詰め物した歯を交換してくれた。

(Edit: I just realized this means I'm replacing the tooth, not the filling. 歯の詰め物, not 詰め物がした歯, right?)

And is 歯 required? In English, "I got a filling" clearly implies "dental filling," but I get the sense that this is not the case in Japanese. Thanks!

  • Why use 「が」 at all? – l'électeur Nov 4 '17 at 16:47
  • Would it be 歯を詰め物した?I'm trying to understand the proper collocations. Thanks. Or の? – mamster Nov 4 '17 at 17:34
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I'd say:

歯に詰め物をした
歯を詰めた

You can use もらう as a subsidiary verb, as in:

歯に詰め物をしてもらった
歯に詰め物を入れてもらった
歯を詰めてもらった

To say "I had a tooth filled with [some material]", you can say 「歯に[樹脂・白いもの・レジン etc.]を詰めた・詰めてもらった」.


To say "I had a filling replaced", you could say:

歯の詰め物を交換した (or 交換してもらった)

... but I think it's more common to say:

歯を詰め直した
歯を詰め直してもらった


And is 歯 required? In English, "I got a filling" clearly implies "dental filling," but I get the sense that this is not the case in Japanese.

Yes... you'd usually need to say 「歯」... though I think you could leave it out when you just said 「歯医者(さん)で...」, like 「昨日、歯医者さんで詰め物をしてもらった。」... But 「昨日、歯医者さんで詰めた。」 still sounds a bit strange...

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In this case, for filling a tooth with ceramic, silver, resins, etc. you can say

歯に詰め物をした。

or

you can say X as the fillings.

Xで歯を詰めた。

Considering the collocations 歯 with が, when your teeth fell out,

歯が抜けた.

When your wisdom teeth touching back teeth,

親知らずが奥歯に当たる.

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