2

For full context, see here: https://www.docdroid.net/hK45eJm/img-20170916-0001-new.pdf

its taken from line 20: 城には金銀が保管してあったはずだ。 => "In the castle, surely the gold and silver did a custody." This translation of course makes little sense. However, I've no idea how else I should do it. I don't know in what other way I should interprete が here than in the function of the subject marker.

  • 1
    が is marking the subject. Nothing surprising. I can't understand what puzzles you. – 永劫回帰 Sep 16 '17 at 19:43
  • 1
    Try reading this other question – requiredandshown Sep 16 '17 at 22:19
  • So 永劫回帰 you think that my translation makes sense? Because to my knowledge, there is no other way to translate this if 金銀 is the subject – Narktor Sep 17 '17 at 6:58
6

城には金銀が保管してあったはずだ。

It's grammatically correct and perfectly natural to say 「XXが(transitive verb)してある」 to mean "XX has been done..."

明鏡国語辞典 states:

ある
🈔〘補助動詞〙
➊ 《「~て(で)ある」の形で、他動詞の連用形を受けて》
変化した動作の結果が現在まで維持されている意を表す。
「壁に絵が掛けてある」「机に本が置いてある」 「荷物乱雑に積んである
(語法)もとの文(「絵を掛ける・本を置く・荷物を積む」)の「を」が「が」に変わり、全体で自動詞化する。「て」は助詞。
❷ 《「~て(で)ある」の形で、動詞連用形を受けて》
何かに備えて手回しよく準備されている意を表す。
「手回しよくご飯が炊いてあった」「きちんと予習が済ませてある」「前もって周辺機器本体の中に組み込んである
(語法)一般にもとの文(「ご飯を炊く・予習を済ませる・機器を組み込む」)の「を」が「が」に変わるが、「を」のままでも使う(「手回しよくご飯炊いてあった」)。
「機器が組み込まれてある」など受身形を受けることも多い。
(表現)「~ておく」に似るが、これは動作主の意図を重視した言い方(「ご飯を炊いておく・予習を済ませておく」)。

As you can see in ❶-(語法), when you add てある to 「を+transitive」(eg 金銀保管する・本置く), the を is replaced by a が, and you get 「が+transitive+てある」(eg 金銀保管してある・本置いてある), in which the whole verb phrase (保管してある・置いてある) functions intransitively. So, the が in your example is a subject marker: 金銀 is the subject of the intransitive verb phrase 保管してある. The てある expresses that the result of an action that caused a change has been maintained to the present time.

And, as stated in ❷-(語法), you can also say 「を+transitive+てある」(eg 現金用意してある・ご飯炊いてある), or 「が+passive+てある」(eg 現金用意されてある・機器組み込まれてある) using the passive form verb.

And as in (表現), you can also use ておく and say 「を+transitive+ておく」(eg 金銀保管しておく・ご飯炊いておく) when you focus on the intent of the agent.

  • 明鏡国語辞典の説明は、質問者の用法を上手に説明できていると思います。今も広辞苑を見ておりますが、とてもそこからこの説明は‌​できません。但し、(語法)中の「を」や「‌​受身形」の併存を可とする説明を見ますと、‌​視点、あるいは主語の変化・推移に述語や助詞の追‌​従ができていない使用例が一般に定着したよ‌​うに思います。背景には主語の明示化が不要‌​な日本語の柔軟さがあるように思っておりま‌​す。従って文法的に正しいかとなると私は「‌​?」です。まずは、良い辞書の説明紹介あり‌​がとうございます。 – mackygoo Sep 18 '17 at 2:58
0

I'm not a native speaker, but my translation here would be:

"Surely, they had hoarded the gold and silver in the castle"

Seems odd that the verb is not either passive or the object marked with 'wo' though, as this seems to be normal, according to examples on alc.co.jp. Perhaps this verb can also function intransitively, in which case it would make perfect sense.

-1

English

城には金銀保管してあったはずだ。

I'm a native speaker of Japanese.

I examined the function of "が" in the given sentence, and I realized Japanese is really difficult.

I looked up the meaning of "が" in jisho.org, it is defined as follows, but none of them seems to correspond to the answer to the given question.

Particle
1 indicates sentence subject (occasionally object)​
「あの音{おと}で考{かんが}え事{ごと}できないわ」と彼女{かのじょ}はタイプライターを見{み}つめながら言{い}った。
"I can't think with that noise", she said as she stared at the typewriter.

2 indicates possessive (esp. in literary expressions)​
The following description and examples of the possessive case are cited from other than jisho.org.
"が" is an old-fashioned usage and is equivalent to "の" today.
誰{た}ために鐘{かね}は鳴{な}る = 誰{だれ}ために鐘は鳴る。我{わ}家{や} = 私{わたし}家{いえ} 
For whom the bell tolls. My house

Particle, Conjunction
3 but; however; still; and
言{い}うまでもないことだローマは1日{にち}にしては成{な}らず。
It goes without saying that Rome was not built in a day.

As for the particle "が", there is an actual function other than the definitions written in jisho.org, as in an example of "(私は)リンゴ好きです I like apples".
They are explained here , here and here. The content of latter two articles is briefly described as follows:

In the case of "好き like", "嫌い dislike", "欲しい want" and "可能動詞 possible verbs", you can also use "が" such as the particle "を" to make the preceding noun an object, where "が" represents the state and "を" represents the will of action.

Even if I examine the new usage of "が", I cannot logically and/or grammatically explain "が" in the phrase given by the questioner.

So, I understand that a case particle "が" in the given phrase was incorrectly used by the writer, and I'll explain it below.

(0) 城には金銀が保管してあったはずだ。

In the given phrase (0), if you omit the redundant part for the explanation and change the tense to the present form, you will get (1)

(1) 城には金銀が保管してある。
I guess the writer wanted to say the following (2) and (3) at the same time.

(2) 城には金銀がある
(3) (彼ら/城主は)その金銀を保管している

As you know, a subject is mostly omitted, so the role of case particles is important in Japanese where a relative is not developed unlike English. The incorrect use of the case particle in the given phrase seems to be due to the neglect of grammatical consistency because of the fact that there were multiple things to tell and each of them had different wording from each other even if the writer knew that correct use of case particles are important.

However, I think that it is almost certainly possible to interpret the intention of the writer even with a phrase containing such a mistake, and expressions of this kind of mistakes are quite common every day.

In addition, there is also a research here on how the reader understands a sentence if a case particle is used incorrectly.

日本語

城には金銀保管してあったはずだ。

上記の文は、一見どこもおかしくないようですが、「金銀」が主語?、「金銀保管」の方が正しいのかな?と思うと、確かにどこか変な気もします。
日本語は難しいですね。

早速、jisho.orgで「が」の意味を調べると次のようになっていました。

Particle
1 indicates sentence subject (occasionally object)​
「あの音{おと}で考{かんが}え事{ごと}できないわ」と彼女{かのじょ}はタイプライターを見{み}つめながら言{い}った。
"I can't think with that noise", she said as she stared at the typewriter.

2 indicates possessive (esp. in literary expressions)​
The following description and examples of the possessive case are cited from other than jisho.org.
"が" is an old-fashioned usage and is equivalent to "の" today.
誰{た}ために鐘{かね}は鳴{な}る = 誰{だれ}ために鐘は鳴る。我{わ}家{や} = 私{わたし}家{いえ} 
For whom the bell tolls. My house

Particle, Conjunction
3 but; however; still; and
言{い}うまでもないことだローマは1日{にち}にしては成{な}らず。
It goes without saying that Rome was not built in a day.

助詞「が」については、「(私は)リンゴ好{す}き」の例にあるように、jisho.org以外の機能が実際にあるようです。そして、ここここここにその説明があります。後の2つの文献にはほぼ同じ説明があり、その内容を簡単に言うと次のようになっております。

「好き」、「嫌い」、「欲しい」などや可能動詞の場合、目的語を表す助詞「を」のように「が」も使える。その場合、「が」は状態を表し、「を」は行為の意志を表す。

この説明によっても、質問者が提示したフレーズの「が」を論理的にあるいは文法的にきちんと説明できそうにありません。

そこで、私は、与えられたフレーズは書き手が格助詞の使い方を間違ったものとして理解し、以下に説明していこうと思います。

(0) 城には金銀が保管してあったはずだ。

(0)のフレーズから、「が」を説明する上で不要な部分を削除し、時制を現在形にすると(1)のようになります。
(1) 城には金銀が保管してある。

私は、作者が次の(2)、(3)のことを同時に言いたかったのだろうと思いました。
(2) 城には金銀がある
(3) (彼ら/城主は)その金銀を保管している

主語がほとんどの場合省略され、英語と違って関係詞が発達していない日本語において助詞の役目は大切です。しかし、この度の過ちは、助詞が大切であることは書き手がたとえ知っていても、伝えたいことが複数あり、しかも各々の言い回しに惑わされて文法的な整合性をおろそかにしたためだと思われます

しかし、このような過ちが入っているフレーズでも我々はほぼ間違いなく作者の意図を解釈できることと、この類の間違い表現はこの例が特別ではなく、しかも間違いだと気づかずに、結構日常使っているように思います。

更に、この文献には、格助詞が間違って使われた場合に読み手がそれをどう理解するかの研究「日本語における自動詞と名詞句との結合違反について」という興味深い内容もあります。

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.