3

I'm reading a story in Japanese (a short novel in digital format) and here's two lines from the end of the chapter I'm reading:

後に、争乱の全てを知ったガーディアンの一人が口にした。

そんな彼だからこそ、健二郎というガーディアンだからこそ、世界そのものに臨む資格があったのかもしれないと。

Context - before these two lines, the author was describing the nature of a character (健二郎) by stating some of his shortcomings, especially compared to his fellow "ガーディアン".

My question is, A) is line 2 a quotation linked to line 1 and is basically quoting what "ガーディアンの一人が口にした"/ "one of the guardians […] said". I'm not sure if it's a direct quotation of "ガーディアンの一人" because there was white spacing between the two lines ( spacing between paragraphs) rather than being in one paragraph together. I'm not familiar with Japanese novels, so perhaps this is a normal formatting in novels?

And B) as for parsing the first line is how I would do it:

later on, one of the guardians who knew everything about the dispute spoke.

But is "後に" referring to something that will happen later or something that has already happened later? I know 口にした is past tense and I'd be more inclined to believe the latter, however from the general context, it makes me think this line is describing a future event. So perhaps it would be better parsed as "later on, one of the guardians who knew everything about the dispute would say it to him." And then insert quotation. Your help is greatly appreciated!

  • 1
    I think your actual questions have been covered quite thoroughly by the existing answers, but I just wanted to point out one small thing about your parsing of the first line. You've translated 全てを知ったガーディアンの一人 as "one of the guardians who knew everything", implying that this guardian was particularly knowledgeable about the dispute all along, but I would say the implication of the JP is the opposite - the simple past tense of 知った would better be translated as "learned" than "knew", indicating that the guardian(s) only found out about the events later on. – Ben Roffey Sep 7 '17 at 9:19
2

A) Is it a direct quotation of "ガーディアンの一人"

It is a quotation of "ガーディアンの一人", which isindicated by the last kana "と" in the second paragraph.

B) Is this future or past

From the contents here, I feel it is something that has already happened later.

If it feels like a future event according to general context, maybe the write has just shifted to another narative angle that is viewing the whole event (and the quote) as in the past.

1

English

後に、争乱の全てを知ったガーディアンの一人が口にした。
そんな彼だからこそ、健二郎というガーディアンだからこそ、世界そのものに臨む資格があったのかもしれないと。

As for the interpretation of A) and B), I think that the fefe's answer is correct.

Apart from fefe's answer, I'll examine and answer the questions of the questioner one by one.

1.

Though the given lines are separated by a Japanese punctuation mark "。" and a white spacing between the two lines (spacing between paragraphs), it could be said they are connected by anastrophe or inversion.
In general, as in the example in (d) below, the example in which two lines of different paragraphs are connected by inversion is not so rare in Japanese.

For example, examples from (b) to (d) made from (a) using inversion, I think the last (d) is the most natural.
(a) 雨が降ってきたと彼は言った。
(b) 彼は言った雨が降ってきたと。
(c) 彼は言った、雨が降ってきたと。
(d) 彼は言った。
  雨が降ってきたと。

However, as the questioner had a doubt, I also realized there is an additional white spacing between the two lines. I think there might be two reasons for the spacing as follows.

The first reason is to enhance the effect of the inversion by not immediately clarifing the content of the story that was not told on the first line. By doing this, you can expect various effects like to give the reader room to think about the content of the story, to give expectations to the reader or to tease the reader.

It is sure that the second reason may be surprising, but I think that the spacing is an aesthetic consideration of the author.

Regarding this white spacing, I assume that the author made judgment from the stand point of spatial arrangement of the characters of the two lines, since the second line is very long or voluminous. In other word, the author thought that with placing the white spacing the printed matter looked better judging from the balance. It seems to be close to the method of margin arrangement from the aesthetic point of view described by the term "布置{ふち}章法{しょうほう} lit. placing or allocation and punctuating method" in calligraphy.

Therefore, the answer to A) is "The second line is the contents itself of the first line".

2.

I think the reason for making the interpretation of the tense confused is the existence of "後{のち}に、" at the beginning of the line. You can interpret the line having "口にだす" like the following (f) to (h).
(f) 争乱の全てを「後に」知ったガーディアンの一人が「争乱を知る前に」口にした。
(g) 争乱の全てを「後に」知ったガーディアンの一人が「争乱を知ったあとで」口にした。
(h) 争乱の全てを知ったガーディアンの一人が「後に」口にした。

Examining the two lines having inversion macroscopically, you could understand that they consist of three parts as follows.
(i) 「後に、」「ガーディアンの一人が口にした。」「〇〇だと。」

If you make this sentence into an ordinary sentence by excluding inversion, it becomes as follows.
(j) 後に、ガーディアンの一人が〇〇だと口にした。

If you put "後に" within the sentence, it will be either (k) or (l), but both have the same tense showing the time.
(k) ガーディアンの一人が後に〇〇だと口にした。
(l) ガーディアンの一人が〇〇だと後に口にした。

We couldn't know the event or time that "後に" in the line refers to according to the lines given by the questioner.
However, it is obvious that "the event or the time" is earlier than "口にした". "口にした" is written in a past tense, so the fact or act of "口にした" is clearly a past event.
The fact that (k) and (l) seems to be correct implies that eventually the interpretation of (h) in (f) to (h) seems to be correct.

Therefore, the answer to B) is "it happened in the past."

日本語

後に、争乱の全てを知ったガーディアンの一人が口にした。
そんな彼だからこそ、健二郎というガーディアンだからこそ、世界そのものに臨む資格があったのかもしれないと。

A)の解釈もB)の解釈も、fefeの回答が正しいと思います。
As for the interpretation of A) and B), I think that the fefe's answer is correct.

私なりに、質問者の質問を順番に検討し回答していきます。

1.最初の文と次の文とは句点「。」や1行空けた改行を挟んで2つの文になっていますが、2つの文は倒置法でつながっています。一般に下の(d)の例にあるように、2つの文が改行を挟んで倒置法で結ばれる例は、日本語ではそれほど珍しくありません

例えば、(a)に対する(b)から(d)の例では、最後の(d)が一番自然に感じます。
(a) 雨が降ってきたと彼は言った。
(b) 彼は言った雨が降ってきたと。
(c) 彼は言った、雨が降ってきたと。
(d) 彼は言った。
  雨が降ってきたと。

しかし、質問者が疑問を持ったように、質問者の提示した2つの文では空白行が1行多めに入っています。その理由は、以下のように2つ考えられます。

最初の理由は、倒置法の効果を一層高めるために、1行目で予告した話の内容をすぐに明らかにしないことです。こうすることで、読み手に話の内容を考える余地を与えるため、あるいは、読み手に期待を持たすため、あるいは読み手をじらすための効果などが期待できます。

2番目の理由は、意外かもしれませんが、作者の美的な配慮であると思います。
これは、2つ目の文が非常に長い(=ボリュームが大きい)ので、作者が文字の空間的配置から判断して行ったもので、空白行を入れた方が印刷物として見たときにバランスが良いと判断したのだと思います。書道でいう「布置章法」という用語で説明されている美的な視点からの余白処理の手法に近いものだと思われます。

従って、質問者のA)に対する回答は、「2行目は、1行目の '口にした' 内容そのもの」です。

2.時制の解釈を迷わすのは、冒頭の「後に、」だと思われます。「口にした」の文は、次の(f)から(h)のように解釈することが可能です。

(f) 争乱の全てを「後に」知ったガーディアンの一人が「争乱を知る前に」口にした。
(g) 争乱の全てを「後に」知ったガーディアンの一人が「争乱を知ったあとで」口にした。
(h) 争乱の全てを知ったガーディアンの一人が「後に」口にした。

倒置法を使った2つの文を巨視的に見ますと、次のように3つの部分から成り立っています。
(i) 「後に、」「ガーディアンの一人が口にした。」「〇〇だと。」

倒置法を外して普通の文にしますと、次のようになります。
(j) 後に、ガーディアンの一人が〇〇だと口にした。

「後に」を文の中に入れると、(k)か(l)のいずれかになりますが、いずれも時制的には同じです。
(k) ガーディアンの一人が後に〇〇だと口にした。
(l) ガーディアンの一人が〇〇だと後に口にした。

確かに(l)の中の「後に」が、「何の後に」であるのかは質問者から与えられた文のどこにも書かれていない。しかし、「何」は「口にした」より過去であることは明白である。「口にした」が過去形で書かれているので、「口にした」事実は明らかに過去の出来事である。

(K)と(l)が正しそうだということは、結局(f)から(h)の中では、(h)の解釈が正しそうだとわかります。

従って、質問者のB)に対する回答は「過去」のことです。

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.