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in a manga about management, someone says 主張し合っても不味いだけ

Does this mean something like 'bring assertions together'? or come to an agreement when you have two different assertions/ideas that might not neccesarily fit together initially?

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The phrase ... し合う, as in 愛し合う, 殺し合う, ののしり合う, denotes the reciprocal nature of the action in question: "they love each other", "they kill one another", "they hurl abuse at each other".

In the case of 主張し合う, they each (vehemently) voice their own conflicting opinions.

The phrase corresponds to "s'entre-tuer", "s'entr aider" in French.

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If the people insist on each one's own right/opinion/idea and never compromise, it just doesn't work (or everyone just doesn't feel good).

The sentence means: "To compromise is a wise decision." "We have to compromise more or less in order to be happy/harmonious." or something like that.

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Contrary to Seesawscene's answer, I think that the given sentence means only "no matter how much you guys insist on your opinion, you can never get good results".

Of course I understand it is natural that the speaker thought "to compromise is a wise decision" or something like that when he said the phrase.

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