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I have a translation of a given sentence in English, but the Japanese version seems to use a verb that seems a little different than what would be intended, so I wanted to ask about it here and double-check on it and maybe have it explained if it is correct. I want to change out a few of the exact noun or pronoun phrases that were used, but this is otherwise the English form of the sentence and the translation that was provided:

Ms. Tanaka wants him to not be a lawyer.

And the translation that was provided took the form:

田中さんは、彼が弁護士にならないようにする。

The interesting thing here is the use of the word "する". Why use "する"? Why not use "欲しがる" or something else?

So is this the correct translation? If not, what is the right way to say that? If it is, then why is the word "する" correct here? Thank you.

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    @GabbyQuattrone I just went ahead and removed that. What I meant was that, even though people would usually take that sentence to mean she wants him to not be a lawyer, its denotation is technically just saying that the statement that she does want him to be a lawyer is not so. What if she doesn't have any preference? Technically you could then say that she doesn't want that, but 99.9% of the time, people would still understand it to mean that she prefers against it. But that may be a little off-subject anyway, so I just went ahead and took it off of there. – Panzercrisis Aug 2 '17 at 17:05
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    Mr Tanaka wants him to not be a lawyer. 「田中さんは彼に弁護士にならないでほしいと思っている」でしょうけど、「田中さんは彼に弁護士になってほしくない 」( lit. Mr Tanaka doesn't want him to be a lawyer) って言ったらだめなんですかね・・ – Chocolate Aug 2 '17 at 23:49
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You're correct. The translation is very weird for me. The natural version would be: 田中さんは彼に弁護士にはならないで欲しいと思っている。

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Ms. Tanaka wants him to not be a lawyer.

田中さんは、彼が弁護士にならないようにする。

The interesting thing here is the use of the word "する". Why use "する"? Why not use "欲しがる" or something else?

Is there any context? It could be interpreted as 'want' only as the reason of it.  

I'm with you. する doesn't say 'want' at all.
That is an interpretation that has read into beyond what it actually says. If someone is telling you to read it that way, I'd say it's misleading.

I think the direct translation of them would be like these:

田中さんは、彼が弁護士にならないようにする。= Ms. Tanaka acts in the way he won't be a lawyer.

Ms. Tanaka wants him to not be a lawyer. = 田中さんは彼が弁護士にならないようにしたい。

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田中さんは、彼が弁護士にならないようにする。

The translation is correct. Let's first parse the translation and translate a bit more directly:

(田中さんは)、(彼が)([弁護士にならない][ようにする])。
("As for Ms. Tanaka"), (he)([to not become lawyer][to wish onto]).

Recall that the expression (conjugated)verb+ようにする is to wish something onto a subject. Here, the subject is . So, what is Ms. Tanaka wishing onto him? That is 弁護士にならない.

If we put this into a direct English phrase that makes more sense:

As for Ms. Tanaka, she wishes that he does not become a lawyer.

The word "wish" is a synonym for a "want" or a "desire" in English, though sometimes might not have the same connotation. Here, we can assume directly that her wish for him to not become a lawyer is equivalent to her not wanting him to be a lawyer. Therefore:

Ms. Tanaka wants him to not be a lawyer.

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