0

metaphor 隠喩 (in'yu) love 愛 (Ai) death 死 (Shi) dream 夢 (yume) I ma looking for the words (translations) which are..hmm how to say it.. which are the "most general" :)

closed as off-topic by l'électeur, Chocolate, macraf, 永劫回帰, virmaior Jul 4 '17 at 16:53

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for translations, transcriptions or proofreading are off-topic unless prior research effort is clearly indicated; we're here to help you learn, not to provide a bulk translation service nor to proofread your translations or transcriptions. See: We don't do translations." – l'électeur, Chocolate, macraf, virmaior
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1

metaphor
My understanding on this section is limited, but here is what my research uncovered. Feel free to comment if this is incorrect.
暗喩【あんゆ】 is specifically metaphor. However, メタファー is more commonly used these days.
直喩【ちょくゆ】 is specifically simile. Similes use like or as which in Japanese equates to ~のような or ~みたい, irrespectively.
四字熟語【よじじゅくご】 is a four-character idiom that represents a classic tale or proverb (often Chinese in origin). This is comparable to That's the last straw! in English. Without knowing the proverb It is the last straw that breaks the camel’s back. this interjection wouldn't make any sense. Japanese has a lot of yojijukugo.
比喩{ひゆ} is used for the general category of metaphors, similes, idioms, and yojijukugo.

love
愛{あい} is far and away the most common word for love. Keep in mind that it is a noun, not a verb. To say, ~ loves ~ you would have to use ~は~を愛してる, which is literally ~ is in the state of loving ~. I once read that this word originally came from the Buddhist concept of attachment (thus originally having a negative connotation), but I can't find the evidence for that at the moment.

death
死【し】 is correct as a noun. The verb is 死ぬ. Keep in mind that this is a more extreme concept in Japanese culture than in the US. For example, the worst profanities I ever heard in Japan include this idea. Otherwise the concept of profanity seemed foreign to people and its equivalence was conveyed grammatically (rather than semantically). All that to say, use it wisely.

dream
夢{ゆめ} is dream in the literal sense of what happens when you sleep. To have a dream is literally to see a dream, 夢を見る.

So, why those four words specifically?

  • thank you. The four words I am going to use in my poetry :) – Marcin Lodyga Jul 4 '17 at 17:37
  • I see. Sorry they put this on hold. It looks to me like "prior research effort is clearly indicated." But, at least you were able to get your answer before the topic was closed. ✌😉 – Rubellite Fae Jul 4 '17 at 19:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.