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This question already has an answer here:

This is actually something I see from time to time :

もう生きてこの屋敷から出しはしない。

Why is it "出しはしない" instead of "出さない" ?

marked as duplicate by l'électeur grammar May 19 '17 at 10:35

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「...はしない」 is a stressed form of a negative form of a verb, or it just makes the sentence stronger.

出さない means in your sentence I'll not let you get/go out, while 出しはしない means I'll never let you get/go out.

Including your 出しはしない, I'll show you some examples as:

出{だ}す - 出{だ}さない - 出{だ}しはしない
食{た}べる - 食{た}べない - 食{た}べはしない
行{い}く - 行{い}かない - 行{い}きはしない
見{み}る - 見{み}ない - 見{み}はしない
聞{き}く - 聞{き}かない - 聞{き}きはしない
話{はな}す - 話{はな}さない - 話{はな}しはしない
触{さわ}る - 触{さわ}らない - 触{さわ}りはしない

I'll show you the way to make this kind of expression:

1) think of a ます-form of a verb:
行く ー> 行きます
2) omit ます from the ます-form of the verb; which is also called a stem form of the verb:
行き
3) add はしない to it:
行きはしない meaning (somebody will) never go.  

  • I see, so this is the "stem" form of a verb plus ~はしない。By "stressed form", you mean that it has the same meaning but it just makes the sentence stronger ? – Ushiromiya May 19 '17 at 10:35
  • @Ushiromiya: That's right. For example, 出さない means in your sentence I'll not let you get/go out, while 出しはしない means I'll never let you get/go out. – mackygoo May 19 '17 at 10:44
  • I see, I see. Thank you, it was really helpful. – Ushiromiya May 19 '17 at 10:45

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