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I was wondering what is a suitable verb for "to offer" and "to share" food.

I know that "to offer" has been answered here

However, according to jisho, 勧める = to offer (wine)​,

so I'm not sure, if it is just for drink or any food wiil do?

For example, if I wanna write down that "I offered a cake to X" so

ケーキをXと勧めた。


Similar for "to share", I'm not sure which one is the best to be used with food.

For example,

I shared a cake with X = ケーキをXと分け合った。

Is this ok?

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if it is just for drink or any food wiil do?

Yes. But 勧める basically means "to recommend (sth)." "To offer" can be translated into Japanese in various ways depending on the context, so more context is needed. Anyway, I think in many food-serving-context just 出す is sufficient if it's not a some kind of special offering to be accepted. e.g. パーティーでは様々な珍しい食事が私達に出された。

I shared a cake with X = ケーキをXと分け合った。

It's OK. You can also just say 分けた。

  • My apologies for not making the context clear and I have edited my question. However, I'm not sure it 出す can be used in this context? – Maru May 16 '17 at 10:01
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    ケーキをX*に*勧めた。 If you actually asked X if s/he wanted a cake, this construction is OK and far better than merely 出す. – someone May 16 '17 at 11:52
  • but i think Japanese dont really use 勧める for food... – みっち May 16 '17 at 23:32
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    You can google several actual book usages just for 「デザートを勧めた」google.co.jp/… and there are also other kanjis 進める、薦める、奨める. – someone May 17 '17 at 11:48
  • @someone may I ask if which one you would rather use for "I offered X a cake"? – Maru May 17 '17 at 22:52
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I think you can say 私は木村さんをディナーに誘った -> I invited Kimura san to dinner (though this might not answer your question?).

For sharing food, I think we can just use シェアする. I may be wrong but as far as I know Japanese dont really have a need to tell others that they shared or offered food to someone? If its in a conversation, you can just say 食べる? or something like パンケーキを分けて食べましょうか? when youre trying to offer someone food.

By the way 分担 is more used for workload.

  • My apologies for not making myself clear. In this case, I simply want to write down that I shared a cake with X, not in the conversation, so I'm not sure about the verb. – Maru May 16 '17 at 10:04

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