4

For example:

  • Naguru - to strike
  • Sasou - to invite
  • Kisu suru - to kiss

How do i know which one between wo and ni is the correct one?

  • Kanoji ni sasou or kanojo wo sasou?
  • Kanojo ni kisu suru or kanojo wo kisu suru?

Its very hard to me because it looks like i have to guess the particle when im using a verb with a person

6

Basically you have to memorize the correct usage of each verb. It's not always possible to logically tell which verb takes which particle. Many English transitive verbs are translated using intransitive verbs in Japanese, and vice versa. See this answer, too.

But roughly speaking, verbs that describe actions which directly and heavily affect the object tend to take を. Some "mild" verbs may take に. That's the basic difference between transitive and intransitive verbs, after all.

  • 彼を殴る, 彼を蹴る (to kick him), 彼を縛る (to bind him), 彼を殺害する (to kill him), ...
  • 彼に頼む (to ask him (a favor)), 彼に感謝する (to thank him), 彼に挨拶する (to greet him), ...

For compound verbs, the second verb usually determines the particle it takes.

  • 殴る 彼殴りかかる 彼殴り合う
  • 聞く 彼から聞き出す
1

If put very simply, wo is the default one that defines the verb done by the subject.
ni on the other hand is the one you use when the subject is affected by an action. I guess you could say it stands for "by".

watashi ha tomodachi wo keri shita.
I kicked my friend.

watashi ha tomodachi ni keri sareta.
I was kicked by my friend.

0
  • Naguru - to strike
  • Sasou - to invite
  • Kisu suru - to kiss

How do i know which one between wo and ni is the correct one?

  • Kanoji ni sasou or kanojo wo sasou?
  • Kanojo ni kisu suru or kanojo wo kisu suru?

〇 Kanojo wo naguru. But, it is no-no to strike her.
✖ Kanojo ni naguru.

〇 Kanojo wo sasou.
✖ Kanojo ni sasou.

〇 Kanojo ni kisu suru.
✖ Kanojo wo kisu suru.

According to the difference between "woを" and "niに" written at the URL http://lang-8.com/183001/journals/634899
the usage "niに" in your samples corresponds to "(5) designate the object" and "woを" corresponds to "(1) Show the object."

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