7

I've encountered a measuring cup which has units of カップ, 水mℓ (水ml), 米[unknown kanji]g and [three unknown kanji]g. 1 カップ corresponds exactly to 200 水mℓ.

According to Wikipedia, there's a Japanese cup that corresponds to 200 ml. By contrast, the US customary cup is approximately 237 mL, and an imperial cup (as in the British empire) is 284 millilitres.

How did Japanese obtain a unit of measure called a カップ which corresponds to neither the British or US unit of measurement?

This post on cooking.SE is about 合, which is 180 mL.

  • 1
    I have no idea, but perhaps you could try to find out if 200 ml is the universal equivalent for カップ in Japan, and when it was introduced. In Sweden, a kopp (コップ) is traditionally somewhere around 150~200 ml (though 250 ml is expected in some more modern recipies), I guess ”elsewhere” had this natural variation as well, as you use/used the actual cups at hand... – Kess Vargavind Feb 20 '17 at 7:58
7

In Japanese recipe books, 1カップ is 200 mL, 大さじ1杯 ("large spoon") is 15 mL, 小さじ1杯 ("small spoon") is 5 mL. Aya Kagawa, a Japanese nutritionist, defined it in 1948.

香川綾

香川は家庭料理で使われる調味料の量を研究し、15cc、10cc、5ccの3種類のスプーンを用意しておけば家庭内でも調味料の使用量が判りやすいことを発見した。また同時に、200ccのカップの内側に50cc毎のメモリをつけた計量カップも考案した。実際には、明治時代に日本初の料理学校を開設した赤堀峰吉が同様のものを既に考案していたとの記録もあるが、香川は独自に考案したものであり、また、一般家庭に計量スプーン・計量カップが普及することになったのも香川の活動によるものである。

大さじ1杯15ミリリットルって誰が決めたの?

香川さんは家庭料理で使われる調味料の量を研究し、戦後間もない1948年に現在使われているものと同じ分量の計量スプーン、50ミリリットルごとに目盛りが入っている計量カップを作り出しました。香川さんはこれらを使うことで料理の手順を文章にして、誰でも同じような味つけができるレシピを初めて作ったのです。これがテレビの料理番組や料理雑誌、家庭科の授業で使われるようになって一般家庭に広く普及していきました。私たちが日常的に使っているあらゆるレシピは、香川さんの発明が元になっているのです。

-4

The metric cup is 250mL, which is exactly 1/4 of a Litre, so I'd imagine they just decided to define a cup as 1/5 of a Litre instead.

This could be to make it closer to the Gou unit, which is 180mL, or perhaps it's a more appropriate serving size for Japanese beverages.

  • 5
    Well intentioned speculation isn't very helpful. – Andrew Grimm Feb 20 '17 at 7:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.