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I came across the following sentence:

(1)、(2)のうち、いずれか一仕様とする

After the sentence there are two options listed. From the context (a guide on how to fill in a form to request quality evaluation) I understood that the meaning is something like "Choose one specification between (1) and (2)". Looking it up on google I found out that it's a fixed expression often used in forms (see here). What I don't understand is:

1) why the verb used is simply する and not a specific one indicating a choice (like 選ぶ or 選択する)?

2) why is the dictionary form of the verb used and not the -てください form or something similar to express a request?

Thank you for your help!

EDIT: for more context, this is the instruction on how to fill the section in question: 申請仕様が複数存在する場合は、「(*)~(*)のうち、いずれか一仕様とする」と表記して下さい。

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1) why the verb used is simply する and not a specific one indicating a choice (like 選ぶ or 選択する)?

Because 「する」, all by itself, has the meaning of "to decide by selecting". デジタル大辞泉 says the following:

㋕…であると判断をくだす。みなす。また、決定する選んでそれに決める

「まあ、これでよしとしよう」「友をよき競争相手とする」「出場を取りやめにする」「私は、コーヒーにする」

Moving on...

2) why is the dictionary form of the verb used and not the -てください form or something similar to express a request?

Easy. That is because it is not a request to begin with. Re-read your own EDIT. 「(*)~(*)のうち、いずれか一仕様とする」 is what your company will be stating to the Ministry, which is why it says 「(*)~(*)のうち、いずれか一仕様とする」と表記して下さい。.

「表記してください」 is what the Ministry is asking you to do and it is already in the "request" form.

The dictionary form is VERY often used to talk about (near) future, as I hope you know.

  • Thank you for your answer! So basically, the company is stating to the Ministry the list of acceptable specifications they will use (or are already using), right? So the correct translation would be "One/Any of the following specifications will be chosen"? – Marco Dec 28 '16 at 15:14
  • @Marco: "chosen" here would be the wrong word. I would make it "One of the following specifications is used". – Jesse Good Dec 28 '16 at 23:04

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