5

For example, while I am running I feel great. This makes me feel happy.

When doing lots of work for low wages I feel tired.

What are the common ways to express my physiological/psychological state?

3
  • Is it your policy to type the first person pronoun in small case?
    – user458
    Jan 6 '12 at 7:13
  • 3
    @sawa. I do not think it is useful to nitpick in this circumstance.
    – Flaw
    Jan 6 '12 at 10:13
  • 1
    @Flaw This kind of styling is due to sloppyness unless it is an intended style (That is why I asked). It is not something that you need advanced knowledge, nor is it a mistake. If someone is asking a question, they should ask in a neat format. That is the etiquette, at least among Japanese speaking people.
    – user458
    Jan 6 '12 at 10:53
4
  • 気持ちいい 'feel good'
  • 爽快だ '(often after sweating, or drinking carbonated drink, etc.) feel refreshed'
  • 疲れた 'got tired'
  • 飽きた 'got bored'
  • うんざりだ 'be sick of'
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  • 1
    Let me add 気持ち悪い'feel sick'--Maybe it's like when you feel like throwing up?
    – user1016
    Jan 6 '12 at 9:27
  • 1
    Can we simply use psycho/physiological adjectives as an exclamation? E.g. "うれしい", "悲しい", "寂しい", "厚い", "寒い", "痛い" etc.
    – Flaw
    Jan 6 '12 at 10:07
  • It's 暑い, not 厚い…
    – user1016
    Jan 6 '12 at 17:32
1

It depends on physiological/psychological state.
「気持ちいい」- "I feel good"
「よく汗をかく」- "I worked well" ("work" = "exercise")
「楽しい」- "It's enjoy", "It's pleasure" etc.
「疲れた」- "I feel tired"
「さっぱりだ」- "I`m feeling refreshed"
etc.

3
  • Hmm, さっぱりだ sounds more like 全然/全然だめだ/全くだめだ. When you feel refreshed you'd say さっぱりした, no?
    – user1016
    Jan 6 '12 at 17:39
  • I heard "さっぱり!!!" from japanese after onsen... Of course, it has a few meanings.
    – Lyu-lyu
    Jan 7 '12 at 1:09
  • 「さっぱり!!」 can mean either「爽快だ」 or 「全然だ」, but 「さっぱりだ。」cannot mean 「爽快だ」, nor can 「さっぱりした」 mean 「全然だ」.
    – user1016
    Jan 8 '12 at 13:03

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