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I found this one on twitter and wanted to ask about particles and the なれました. It was posted shortly after a concert.

福岡、楽しかったし、皆との距離が近いから表情も良く見えたし、いい感じに熱くなれました。ありがとう、福岡。

I only learned some basic grammar and it's been a while since I really used my Japanese. I think I understand roughly what is said here, but I can't get my head around the particles and for some time I try not just to understand but also to translate. So this is how far my boyfriend and I have come to translate this.

Fukuoka, it was enjoyable (し), as (から) the distance to everyone there (みんあとの?) was short your facial expressions were seen well (し), this pleasant feeling made it warm. (なれました?) Thanks Fukuoka.

Does this translation cover everything in this sentence or am I missing something?

My questions would be:

  • What's the し doing? We thought it might be just a numeration particle?

  • Why are there two particles after another in との and what does it do? Has it anything to do with the し?

  • And I'm really not sure about the last part with the なれました. I don't know how to translate this. It might be a typing error but I don't know...

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  1. What's the し doing? We thought it might be just a numeration particle?
    し is a conjunction to indicate "and" in an emphatic way.

  2. Why are there two particles after another in との and what does it do? Has it anything to do with the し?
    の by itself means "of". But it can preceded by other particles to make the relationship clearer.
    Examples:
    皆の距離: the distance of everybody
    皆との距離: the distance from everybody
    友達の手紙: a letter of a friend
    友達からの手紙: a letter from a friend
    友達への手紙: a letter to a friend.

  3. And I'm really not sure about the last part with the なれました. I don't know how to translate this. It might be a typing error but I don't know...
    なれました is the potential form of the verb なる (to become).
    So 熱くなれました literally means "it was possible to become warm".
    In normal English it means "it was exciting".

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