5

For verbs:

授業があるんじゃない(ですか)

授業がないんじゃない(ですか)

For -i adjectives:

その映画が面白いんじゃない(ですか)

その映画が面白くないんじゃない(ですか)

For nouns and -na adjectives, the negative is 「じゃない」:

彼は学生なんじゃない(ですか)

So if I want to ask "isn't that he is not a student?", can I use this:

彼は学生じゃないんじゃない(ですか)

I saw a question that said 「その人が買うんじゃないの」 in plain form. If I change it into polite speech, will it be 「その人が買うんじゃないんですか。」?

Does that mean : verb/i-adj(na-adj/noun) + の(なの) + じゃない + の + ですか existed?

0
3

To answer the titular question: yes.

A google search will immediately get you a few examples.

From 「”じゃないかな”」に関連した英語例文の一覧 (emphasis mine):

「それどころじゃないんじゃないかな」

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald『グレイト・ギャツビー』

If I change it into polite speech, will it be その人が買うんじゃないんですか。?

Sounds sound to me. However, you might want to phrase it differently depending on how formal you want to, or need to, sound. "ん" is commonly used as a less formal version of "の". Similarly, "じゃない" is a less formal version of "ではない".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.