2

I know how to say "I've never done verb-phrase" using verb-phrase ことがない e.g. ケーキを食べることがない. But how would I say something like

"Even though I've wanted to try eating cake, I've never done it"

Here's my attempt:

ケーキを食べてみたかったのに、そんなことがない

  • I'm not really sure what you want to say, but the verb must be in the past tense to express "never done". On top of that... there's always going to be an "it". Sorry I'm really confused :D You could say for example: ケーキを食べてみたかったのに、今まで食べたことがないんだ。 – sonigo Jun 4 '16 at 20:17
  • @sonigo My point was to avoid repeating the verb 食べる when I say "I've never done it". – user3856370 Jun 4 '16 at 20:28
  • 2
    Is something wrong with repeating the same word in Japanese? Or are you just seeking other options, knowing that it is completely OK to repeat words in Japanese? – l'électeur Jun 4 '16 at 23:41
  • 1
    I've wanted to try eating って、「食べてみたかったけど」よりも「食べてみた (んだ)けど」「(前から/ずっと)食べてみたいと思ってる (んだ)けど」とかになるんじゃないですかね・・・ – Chocolate Jun 5 '16 at 0:50
  • 1
    「まだしたことがないんだ」「それを経験したことがない」とかよりもやっぱり「まだ食べたことない(んだ)」「まだ食べられてない(んだ)」のように言うと思います。「以前からずっと食べてみたいと思ってるんだけど、(まだ)一度も機会がなくってね。」みたいのなら言えるかも、と思います。 – Chocolate Jun 5 '16 at 1:33
1

If you want to say that without repeating yourself or "not saying it" you could say something like this.

今まで食{た}べたいと思{おも}っていたが、まだ口{くち}にしたことがない

I have always wanted to eat cake, but I never have (eaten it).

This last bit infers 「経験{けいけん}」 or experience without actually saying the word 「経験{けいけん}」. ie, 「経験{けいけん}したことがない」

まだ口{くち}にしたことがない

I have never (eaten)...

Eg,

手{て}にしたことがない

This carries the meaning of never getting something.

  • 手にしたことない -> 「が」は要りませんか?(「手にしたことない」と…) – Chocolate Jun 5 '16 at 4:38
  • @chocolate, good catch. Typo on my behalf. – KyloRen Jun 5 '16 at 5:06
1

You can use 経験する for "to experience", and pair it with the grammar point you mentioned:

I have never experienced (that).

(それを)経験したことがありません

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.