4

How might you express a rude, begrudging permission in Japanese? I realize this is something you'd never encounter in practice or in public, but I'm writing a fictional story about some rather rude people so it's useful to know.

Sentences I have in mind here:

"If you must stay, stay in this room."

"If you must drink, drink my water."

"If you must come with us, help us carry."

  • 1
    How about 「どうしてもというのなら」「どうしてもいるというのなら/いたいというのなら」「どうしても来たいのなら/来たいというのなら・・・」 – Chocolate Jun 3 '16 at 8:35
1

Well, the below is just your examples.

"If you must stay, stay in this room."

居るんなら、ここに居ろ

"If you must drink, drink my water."

水を飲むなら、僕の水を飲め

"If you must come with us, help us carry."

来るんなら、一緒に運べ

There are plenty of situations where you need to be forceful. I am not saying that you would use these examples, but there are times when you need to give orders and it can come across quite harsh.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I suggest 俺の水を飲め. It is more rude than 僕の水を飲め. – Yuuichi Tam Jun 3 '16 at 7:33
  • @YuuichiTam, did not want to sound like a complete jerk. LOL I am going to leave it as is, your comment is enough I feel. – KyloRen Jun 3 '16 at 7:46
  • Well, rather than truly rude, I'm really going for more "imperious," the sort of thing that might get used in a military command - or an incantation, for that matter. These seem about right, though. – linkhyrule5 Jun 3 '16 at 7:54
  • @linkhyrule5, I think you will find that even in military 「俺」 would be used. I did not use it b/c, I have heard foreigners here in Japan use 「俺」 and it sound strange, unless they were really , really good at speaking. – KyloRen Jun 3 '16 at 8:05
  • 1
    「どうしてもというのなら・・」とかですかね・・ – Chocolate Jun 3 '16 at 8:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.