3

Both of them mean 「〜とあれば」. I know that 「とあっては」is followed by negative clauses like 「ないわけにはいかない」、「ほかない」、「しかない」、etc. (according to this)

However, the answer for the following sentence is A, which contradicts to the above explanation. I don't know why.

さすが世界大会__、どの試合も目が離せない。

A. とあって

B. とあっては

2

I read your link. It says a sentence which means condition is placed before とあっては. So B is unnatural because 世界大会 isn't condition.

However 世界大会が開催されるとあっては、どの試合も目が離せないだろう may make sense because 世界大会が開催される is condition. In addition, the phrase "とあっては" isn't often used and literaryism.

I think it is better that さすが~とあって is used as one phrase which means " as expected of ".

3

This is really difficult.

Both 「X とあって、Y。」「X とあっては、Y。」 can be a valid sentence depending on its context.

Firstly, 「X とあっては、Y。」expects that usually "it is not Y." But, because of X, it is Y.

For example,

マイナー競技とはいえ、世界大会とあっては、警備が厳しい。

It is expected that a meet of a minor sport is not highly guarded, but the speaker finds this is exceptional because this is world wide. So, it is highly guarded.

On the other hand, 「X とあって、Y。」 does not refer to usual cases.

各国から要人の集まる世界大会とあって、警備が厳しい。

It is highly guarded. It is natural because a lot of VIPs come from all over the world.


Let's get back to the original sentence.

さすが世界大会__、どの試合も目が離せない。

「さすが」 and 「どの試合も目が離せない」give the context.

「さすが」 is an adjective which means "there is a fact which proves something is as good as expected or as a reputation, and the speaker is impressed."

In this case, the fact is that 「どの試合も目が離せない(not boring at all)」.

Let's put とあっては and check what it means.

*さすが世界大会とあっては、どの試合も目が離せない。

  • とあっては implies: It is expected that every game is boring. But, this is exceptional because this is an international cup. So, it is not boring at all.
  • さすが implies: Also, the fact that every game is not boring proves the international cup is as great as expected. The speaker is impressed about it.

So, OK, did you expect the games are great or not? There is a contradiction.

On the other hand, 「とあって」 does not have this problem.

  • とあって implies: No game is boring. It is natural because it is an international cup.
  • さすが implies: The fact that every game is not boring proves the international cup is as great as expected. The speaker is impressed about it.

They are consistent.


「さすがに」 is similar but different. It means "there is a fact which makes something exceptionally as good as expected or as a reputation, and the speaker is impressed."

さすがに世界大会とあっては、どの試合も目が離せない。

In this case, everything is consistent. It is expected that every game is usually not that interesting.

1

The point is さすが. Because of it, B is unnatural. If it was さすがに or just without it, both A and B would be fine.

It's too difficult for me to explain, but combination of さすが and とあっては doesn't make good sense. It sounds a slip of さすが…とあっては, otherwise.

  • 1
    Thanks for you answer but could you give me the reason why you say my questions are mean, too minor, and uneducational? – William May 30 '16 at 15:34
  • 1
    I believe @user4092 was referring to the questions from your JLPT exercise book -- not your questions per se. – oals May 30 '16 at 17:32

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