1

"Master suppression techniques" also known as "domination techniques" are defined as "ways to indirectly suppress and humiliate opponents".

Master suppression techniques are defined as strategies of social manipulation by which a dominant group maintains such a position in a (established or unexposed) hierarchy.

The five major master suppression techniques are summarized as:

  1. Making invisible - to silence or otherwise marginalize persons in opposition by ignoring them
  2. Ridicule - in a manipulative way to portray the arguments of, or their opponents themselves, in a ridiculing fashion
  3. Withold information - to exclude a person from the decision making process, or knowingly not forwarding information so as to make the person less able to make an informed choice
  4. Double bind - to punish or otherwise belittle the actions of a person, regardless of how they act
  5. Heap blame / put to shame - to embarrass someone, or to insinuate that they are themselves to blame for their position

is there an equivalent expression in Japanese? How would one accurately express the same meaning as a phrase?


The best fit I can think of is "いじめ", or perhaps "虐待", but it is too general, and doesn't carry the meaning of "techniques" as far as I know. Perhaps "抑制(するための)テクニック" but that comes off as a chiropractic term.

2

First of all, there is a book/article of this in Japanese, http://www009.upp.so-net.ne.jp/mariko-m/nor_030517report.html

They translated it as "5大抑圧テクニック", same as you. Base on the description of each techniques, another way to explain/call it can be ブラック心理学.
If you want to make it sounds positive 相手を動かすテクニック will get the meaning across, but it is not a direct translation of the given name anymore.

  • Thanks. I wasn't expecting to find a published reference. ブラック心理学 is also a phrase I wasn't entirely familiar with, that seems to fit really well too. – Amani Kilumanga May 30 '16 at 6:41

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