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I chanced upon a Facebook advertisement of an airline with the following sentence.

香港国際空港にあるキャセイパシフィック航空の「ザ・ピア」ビジネスクラスラウンジ。

I understand what it is trying to say. However, I was wondering what if I jumble the words and say it this way:

キャセイパシフィック航空の「ザ・ピア」ビジネスクラスラウンジは香港国際空港にある。

Does it sound like a child is saying it? I wonder if the first sentence is a more preferred way to say it? Or the second structure is invalid?

Is there a specific sentence pattern for this?

Thanks

  • The first sentence isn't a complete sentence. I have seen sentences like that, but mostly in marketing or advertising related stuff. Just like in English it can sound dramatic: "A new message board that solves your problems. Can you handle it?" I think the sentence sentence is fine, though, but less dramatic. – Locksleyu May 25 '16 at 14:52
  • Thanks. How would you make the first sentence complete? – cgo May 25 '16 at 14:59
  • Make a statement about ザ・ピア using a verb or adjective. Right now, it is only a noun phrase, not a sentence at all. – l'électeur May 26 '16 at 0:52
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The first is translated as ビジネスクラスラウンジ「ザ・ピア」 of キャセイパシフィック航空 which is in 香港国際空港.

The second is translated as ビジネスクラスラウンジ「ザ・ピア」 of キャセイパシフィック航空 is in 香港国際空港.

The both are correct and the first one is a noun phrase, the second one is a sentence.

  • The first one is NOT a sentence: It is only a noun phrase. – l'électeur May 25 '16 at 15:23
  • Yes, I edit it. – Yuuichi Tam May 25 '16 at 15:29

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