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I've got these two sentences:

屋上にあがると景色がきれいです。

駅の前に銀行ができると便利になります。

I understand the vocabulary, but I don't get the usage of と.

Also, I don't get why あがる is used instead of のぼる. I think のぼる is used when the subject actively goes up, and あがる when it goes up without having control of it himself (kind of like the sun going up), so, I imagine the sentence means something like the views when getting up onto the roof are really beautiful, and to get up onto the roof you need to get there on your own means, so... why あがる?

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    related – goldbrick Apr 11 '16 at 3:25
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    This と has already been addressed a dozen times here. It's the conditional と you can see it as an “if”. – 永劫回帰 Apr 11 '16 at 4:48
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The と in the first sentence describes a natural sequence. It's like the view unfolds before you: "When you get to the roof, the view is beautiful."

In the 2nd sentence (which is incomplete imo, as you don't know what is going to be convenient) it shows the order in which the actions are happening: "After the bank in front of the station is built, it will become convenient."

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