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I'm trying to figure out what "かみつれを手に". The word かみつれ is in hiragana, so I can't use kanji to figure it out. I have a feeling it means "( something ) in hand".

I searched in Google, and chamomile came up, but I have doubting feelings about that since,

  1. aren't imported words in katakana?
  2. if it were imported, wouldn't it read "kamomiru"?

I just don't know what かみつれ is. As far as Google results show, it means holding Pokemon's Gym Leader Elesa by the hand. Can anyone confirm chamomile or perhaps give かみつれ's real meaning?

  • Can you give context for where you are seeing it? – istrasci Mar 8 '16 at 21:05
  • @istrasci, it's a song title. So, there's not much context, unfortunately, other than the song by ChouCho, which I suppose may directly give meaning to it; or the song has no relation to the title and it was meant to be some deep abstract thing. – user2738698 Mar 8 '16 at 21:11
  • There are a number of things to address here, but first, are you aware that カミツレ is Gym Leader Elesa's name in Japanese? – snailboat Mar 8 '16 at 22:24
  • @snailboat Yes, I ran across that fact on this search – user2738698 Mar 8 '16 at 22:32
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かみつれ(カミツレ) is the Japanese name for chamomile, a type of flower.

https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%82%AB%E3%83%A2%E3%83%9F%E3%83%BC%E3%83%AB

Edit:

Since you edited your question, I'm adding to my answer. かみつれ is the Japanese name, and therefore it does not necessarily need to be in katakana.

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    I was guessing the word being in hiragana was because the authors intended a kind of double-meaning, interpreting it as either the character's name or the actual word. I'm pretty bad at that "lyric interpretation" stuff, though :-) Since the OP has accepted your answer, which doesn't really discuss the etymology, maybe we should split out the part where the OP asks about etymology into a separate question? – snailboat Mar 8 '16 at 22:48

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